Wed.Feb 21, 2024

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On The Danger Of Popular Ideas In Education

TeachThought

New ideas, often in the shape of 'fads,' are, at best, distractions. It just might be that education already has more than enough new ideas. The post On The Danger Of Popular Ideas In Education appeared first on TeachThought.

Education 260
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What’s Behind the Evolution of Neanderthal Portraits

Sapiens

Since the 1800s, Neanderthal depictions have evolved not only with changing science but also due to social views. An archaeologist explains why visualizations of our evolutionary cousins matter. NEANDERTHALS’ FIRST PORTRAITS In 1888, a few decades after the first scientifically named Homo neanderthalensis fossil surfaced, anthropologist and anatomist Hermann Schaaffhausen made a portrait of what that Neanderthal might have looked like in life.

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educators

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Simple Ways To Use Artificial Intelligence In The Classroom

TeachThought

Google can't replace critical thinking. Artificial intelligence is similar: it can be useful or can also make users overly dependent on it. The post Simple Ways To Use Artificial Intelligence In The Classroom appeared first on TeachThought.

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Revealing an AI Literacy Framework for Learners and Educators

Digital Promise

The post Revealing an AI Literacy Framework for Learners and Educators appeared first on Digital Promise.

Education 158
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7 Reasons Why Online Learning Is The Future Of Education

TeachThought

With demand for continuous skill development, online education is well-positioned as a key player in the future of educational delivery. The post 7 Reasons Why Online Learning Is The Future Of Education appeared first on TeachThought.

Education 186
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As States Make It Easier to Become a Teacher, Are They Reducing Barriers or Lowering the Bar?

ED Surge

Everett Anderson was determined to become a teacher. It had always been his plan, and he had no reason to doubt it: He’d earned a full scholarship to college and acceptance into a leadership program designed to attract and retain Black male teachers. This story also appeared in USA Today. There was just one problem. Even as Anderson excelled in his coursework at Jackson State University, he struggled to pass one of the licensure tests required in Mississippi to gain full admittance into the teac

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Unraveling the Mysteries of Down Syndrome and Edwards Syndrome in Past Societies

Anthropology.net

Ancient DNA analysis 1 unveils chromosomal disorders in prehistoric human populations across Spain, Bulgaria, Finland, and Greece dating back to 4,500 years ago. Led by Dr. Adam "Ben" Rohrlach and Dr. Kay Prüfer, an international team scrutinized approximately 10,000 ancient human DNA samples, revealing six cases of Down syndrome and one of Edwards syndrome.

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Mapping Civic Measurement: One Year Later

Institute for Citizens & Scholars

Discover the latest insights and findings from the Mapping Civic Measurement Report's one-year anniversary release.

Civics 95
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Delving into the Past: Unearthing the Oldest Bead in the Americas

Anthropology.net

Ancient artifacts have a unique ability to transport us back in time, offering glimpses into bygone eras. Recently 1 , archaeologists unearthed a tube-shaped bead in Wyoming, estimated to be around 12,940 years old – the oldest bead ever discovered in the Western Hemisphere. The hare bone bead. (Todd Surovell Photos) A Peek into Personal Ornamentation Measuring just 7 millimeters long and 2.9 millimeters in diameter, this diminutive bead holds significant insights into the Clovis culture,

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2024 Ludwig Koenen Fellowship

Society for Classical Studies

2024 Ludwig Koenen Fellowship kskordal Wed, 02/21/2024 - 09:05 Image The Ludwig Koenen Fellowship is open to graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and untenured faculty, including contingent faculty, who are seeking training in or to conduct research in papyrology. As of 2021, applicants do not have to be SCS members. The deadline for applications is April 22, 2024.

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On the Podcast: The Dispatch with R. Joseph Rodríguez

Heinemann Blog

Welcome to The Dispatch, a Heinemann podcast series. Over the next several weeks, we'll hear from Heinemann thought leaders as they reflect on the work they do in schools across the country and discuss, from their perspective, the most pressing issues in education today. Today we hear from secondary teacher R. Joseph Rodríguez.

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Once and Future Worlds in Fukushima Japan: Postdisaster as Emptiness and Remainder

Anthropology News

On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9 earthquake off the coast of Japan’s Fukushima Prefecture generated a tsunami that washed away whole neighborhoods and led to a series of nuclear meltdowns in the nearby Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. As a result of the ensuing nuclear contamination, towns near the power plant were evacuated and closed to residents.

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Free Geography CPD in Madrid

Living Geography

Developed by Discover the World in association with the Geographical Association. Enhance your lessons with our FREE CPD for geography teachers! Delivered in collaboration with Geographical Association , we're bringing you high-quality CPD and networking opportunities for teachers in Spain including: How to raise standards in your department with Becky Kitchen from The Geographical Association How to improve your teaching using AI with Richard Allaway from geographyalltheway.

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Deciphering Neanderthal Ingenuity: Evidence of Advanced Cognitive Abilities

Anthropology.net

Recent research 1 has unveiled a remarkable aspect of Neanderthal intelligence: their adeptness in crafting complex adhesives to bind stone tools, challenging prior assumptions of their cognitive capabilities. Led by Patrick Schmidt and Ewa Dutkiewicz, an interdisciplinary team of scientists from New York University, the University of Tübingen, and the National Museums in Berlin embarked on a groundbreaking study, published in Science Advances.

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Ashdown Forest - Winnie the Pooh

Living Geography

Catch up with Countryfile from last Sunday to see the close links between the Ashdown Forest and its fictional connections with Winnie the Pooh and the Hundred Acre Wood. Check out the website here. The walk on the episode shows the link between Shepherd's illustrations, the story and specific locations. What are your nearby literary landscapes?

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Maximizing the Impact of Small-Group Literacy Interventions in Elementary Classrooms

Heinemann Blog

Literacy is a cornerstone of elementary education, pivotal in shaping students’ academic journeys and opening doors for them in the future. Many children need additional, responsive support to master the nuances of reading and writing.

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The Earliest Evidence of Homo Sapiens in Eastern Asia

Anthropology.net

In the heart of northeastern China lies the Shiyu site, a treasure trove of ancient artifacts that has recently rewritten the narrative of human migration. At this archaeological hotspot, researchers 1 have unearthed fragments of rock and bone dating back a staggering 45,000 years, marking the earliest evidence of Homo sapiens in Eastern Asia. Unearthing Clues to Ancient Migration For decades, the Shiyu site has tantalized archaeologists with its rich deposits, hinting at a long and complex hist

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Your Free Guide to Teaching During an Election

Heinemann Blog

With another historic election on the horizon, authors of The Civically Engaged Classroom offer a free guide for navigating teaching during this time.

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Contributions by Scholars of Color Interview Series: Highlights from Dr. Kathie Stromile Golden of Mississippi Valley State University

Political Science Now

Contributions by Scholars of Color Interview Series: Highlights from Dr. Kathie Stromile Golden, Mississippi Valley State University Dr. Kathie Stromile Golden reflects on how the strong women in her family shaped who she is today. She is the Provost and Senior VP for Academic Affairs at Mississippi Valley State University, as well as the Executive Director of NCOBPS.

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Meet Bo Feng, 2023 APSA Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grantee

Political Science Now

The American Political Science Association is pleased to announce the Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant (DDRIG) Awardees for 2023. The APSA DDRIG program provides support to enhance and improve the conduct of doctoral dissertation research in political science. Awards support basic research which is theoretically derived and empirically oriented.