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The Difference Between Constructivism And Constructionism

TeachThought

The Difference Between Constructivism And Constructionism by Terry Heick While working on the learning theory visual overview , I realized I couldn’t clearly explain the difference between constructivism and constructionism. So I did a little research and initially didn’t find much to ease my confusion. The Difference Between Constructivism And Constructionism Constructivism is–more or less–the same thing.

Artifacts 244
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Decomposing decision-making: a cognitive dimension to teacher rehearsal

A Psychology Teacher Writes

A significant challenge for teacher educators is how to help large groups of teachers get better. Professional development often fails to cater for individual needs because it’s unlikely that in a room full of teachers everyone is in roughly the same place in terms of knowledge, experience and expertise. Bespoke approaches, such as instructional coaching, might be more effective but are not easily scalable (Coe, 2023).

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Personalize: Meeting the Needs of ALL Learners

A Principal's Reflections

Fate has a funny way of bringing together people with similar views and passions. In March of 2022, I worked with a school system in Provo, Utah. During a roundtable discussion, I was asked to discuss key aspects of personalized learning that are critical to successful implementation. There were a lot of people in the room who listened to what I had to say and seemed to be hanging on every word.

Tradition 337
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How Semantic Pulse Surveys Can Boost Your School Climate

Cult of Pedagogy

Listen to my interview with Karen Borchert ( transcript ): Sponsored by Alpaca We have a lot of conversations about what should be done to make schools better. In these conversations, I hear a lot of ideas and I have a lot of ideas, but I think there’s one practice that should be done by any school that wants to improve, and it’s simple and free: Ask the people who are directly affected.

Pedagogy 290
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Grad programs have been a cash cow; now universities are starting to fret over graduate enrollment

The Hechinger Report

ATLANTA — Two construction cranes hover over a giant worksite just outside the Scheller College of Business at the Georgia Institute of Technology. What they’re building is both a show of optimism in and a way to attract more students to something universities badly need but are beginning to worry about: graduate education. The $200 million project will house Scheller’s graduate and executive business programs in one tower, connected to Georgia Tech’s School of Industrial and Systems Engineering

Tradition 124
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Announcing the winners of Econ Frame 2024

CORE Econ

Discover the entries of this year’s winners Econ Frame is a photo competition where learners are invited to submit a photo showing an economics concept presented in any of CORE Econ’s ebooks – alongside a few lines of explanation. This project is jointly run by CORE Econ and the Centre for Teaching and Learning Economics (CTaLE) at UCL and kindly co-sponsored by Mount Royal University.

Economics 116
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The Cheadle Moon Exhibition: Commemorating Eighty Years Since the Death of Mary Adela Blagg, Astronomer and Selenographer – Samantha Hughes-Johnson

Women's History Network

During Spring 2024 the market town of Cheadle in Staffordshire, often confused with its namesake just over the county border in Cheshire, has seen an influx of thousands of people keen to see the town’s Cheadle Moon exhibition, which commemorates the life and works of the English astronomer and selenographer, Mary Adela Blagg (17 May […]

History 98

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2024 Mellon Emerging Faculty Leaders

Institute for Citizens & Scholars

The Institute for Citizens & Scholars has named 10 scholars as Mellon Emerging Faculty Leaders (MEFL) for 2024.

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OPINION: There are lessons to be learned from Finland, but giving smartphones to young children isn’t one of them

The Hechinger Report

Since I first moved to Finland in 2013, I have witnessed an ever-deepening societal problem that has devastated student learning. Childhood has become dominated by digital devices. This is a global trend, but it disproportionately affects Finnish children. Finland’s teenagers, formerly the world’s highest achievers , still perform above average on the Program for International Student Assessment, or PISA, but they turned in their lowest-ever average scores in math, science and reading in the lat

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Home Visiting Programs Aren’t Just for Families. They Can Support Child Care Providers Too.

ED Surge

Soon after Miriam Bravo began watching her 2-year-old grandson full-time, she realized that many years had passed since she was last responsible for a young child. Feeling a bit rusty, she turned to the internet to seek out activities suitable for little Tadeo and advice for how best to support him. She found some resources online, such as songs to sing with him, but Bravo wanted more.

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Experience and the educational ecosystem: why retention of experienced colleagues matters for beginning teachers

Becoming a History Teacher

Photo by zhang kaiyv on Pexels.com A little while ago I had the opportunity to chat with a teacher who is 20 odd years into their teaching career. As they spoke about their Trust’s approach to curriculum, the demands being placed upon their department through whole school initiatives and the challenges that come from a high turnover of colleagues, I was struck by how their experience provided them with much needed perspective.

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Trends in Leadership: 4 Takeaways from Education Week’s Symposium

Digital Promise

Education Week’s 2024 Leadership Symposium offered timely insights around educator recruitment and retention, equitable AI use, and family partnerships.

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Horses and Native Americans: Rewriting The Timeline

Anthropology.net

Indigenous Knowledge and Science Unite Recent research has reshaped our understanding of when horses were reintroduced to North America. Spaniards brought horses to Mexico in 1519, but it was Indigenous peoples who swiftly transported these horses north along trade routes. A new study in Science 1 reveals that many Native American populations across the Great Plains and the Rockies had incorporated horses into their cultures by the early 1600s, long before direct contact with Europeans.

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PROOF POINTS: As teacher layoffs loom, research evidence mounts that seniority protections hurt kids in poverty

The Hechinger Report

Teacher layoffs are likely this fall as $190 billion in federal pandemic aid expires. By one estimate , schools spent a fifth of their temporary funds on hiring new people, most of them teachers. Those jobs may soon be cut with many less experienced teachers losing their jobs first. The education world describes this policy with a business acronym used in inventory accounting: LIFO or “Last In, First Out.

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How I Used Basketball to Help Black Boys Embrace Emotional Wellness

ED Surge

"It would be amazing if the boys were able to find their voices and develop confidence before they go into high school," my supervisor remarked during a meaningful conversation about Black boys in our school. She expressed genuine concern about the challenges many staff members faced in effectively relating to and supporting Black boys. She noted that the boys would often have emotional outbursts in class, and when confronted about their behavior, they would become unresponsive and disengaged.

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Juneteenth: Teaching Outside the Textbook

Zinn Education Project

Dancer at Juneteenth celebration in Washington, D.C. Photo by Carol M. Highsmith. Source: Library of Congress Juneteenth — June 19th, also known as Emancipation Day — is one of the commemorations of people seizing their freedom in the United States. Celebrate. But We Can’t Teach? This beautiful tradition of Black freedom should be taught in school.

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Education: Control, Inequality and Innovation

ShortCutsTV

1979 is a key date in the development of education in England and Wales because it was in that year that Margaret Thatcher became Prime Minister and began a process of modernising conservatism, under both Conservative and Labour governments, that still, nearly 50 years later, exerts a vice-like grip on primary, secondary and, increasingly tertiary […]

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How Researchers and Coaches are Working Together to Innovate STEM Education

Digital Promise

The post How Researchers and Coaches are Working Together to Innovate STEM Education appeared first on Digital Promise.

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Even as women outpace men in graduating from college, their earnings remain stuck

The Hechinger Report

BOSTON — Madeline Szoo grew up listening to her grandmother talk of being laughed at when she spoke of going to college and becoming an accountant. “‘No one will trust a woman with their money,’” relatives and friends would scoff. When Szoo excelled at math in high school, she got her share of ridicule, too — though it was slightly more subtle. “I was told a lot, ‘You’re smart for a girl,’ ” she said.

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Should College Become Part of High School?

ED Surge

Last year, when Jayla Arensberg was a sophomore at Burnsville High School near St. Paul, Minnesota, a teacher showed her a flier saying that a program at the school could save her $25,000 on college. “I said, ‘I really need that,’” the student remembers. She was interested in college, but worried that the cost could keep her from pursuing higher education.

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'Teaching Times' article on the new GCSE Natural History

Living Geography

A cross-posting from my GCSE Natural History blog, which has over 300 posts. A new article in 'Teaching Times' by Mary Colwell gives a bit of an update into the state of the GCSE Natural History, and its possible introduction in 2026. She mentions the assessment as being based on coursework and fieldwork - I think that is very unlikely. The Subject Criteria have now been written and were signed off by Damien Hinds, who is the current Minister of State for Schools.

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TCI Monthly Recap: May 2024

TCI

This month, TCI released updates to simplify navigation and a feature to help teachers share student work with parents. Check out the highlights from this month and share them with your teacher community. Sneak Peek of New Homepages: In July, the teacher and student homepages will get a new look, with dedicated spaces for easy access to assignments and a convenient pop-up table of contents.

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How Organizations Can Design Transparent & Research-Based Micro-credentials for Greater Equity

Digital Promise

The post How Organizations Can Design Transparent & Research-Based Micro-credentials for Greater Equity appeared first on Digital Promise.

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OPINION: Women education leaders need better support and sponsorships to help catch up

The Hechinger Report

In matters both big and small, women in education leadership are treated, spoken to and viewed differently than their male colleagues. And it impacts everything from their assignments and salaries to promotions. The career moves that are open to aspiring women leaders often propel them toward a very real glass cliff — leadership roles in which the risk of failure is high.

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How One District Takes STEM Learning to the Next Level

ED Surge

This is part of a three-article series covering key principles to consider when building out computer science programs in your academic setting. Read the other articles here and here. At the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) , one of the largest and most diverse school districts in the United States, we constantly plan new educational programs, prioritizing equitable access and ensuring students graduate prepared for success in college, career and life.

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Call for Applications: The Claremont Prize for the Study of Religion

Society for Classical Studies

Call for Applications: The Claremont Prize for the Study of Religion kskordal Thu, 06/13/2024 - 08:20 Image The Claremont Prize for the Study of Religion Deadline for submissions: September 3, 2024 The Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life at Columbia University is seeking submissions to its annual Claremont Prize for the Study of Religion.

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Unveiling Neanderthal Hearths: A Major Development in Archaeological Science

Anthropology.net

An innovative approach to studying Neanderthal hearths has been hailed as a "major" breakthrough in archaeology, promising to shed new light on the behaviors of prehistoric humans. This groundbreaking research, published in the journal Nature 1 , utilized advanced dating techniques to analyze hearths at the El Salt site in Spain, revealing intricate details about the lives of Neanderthals.

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Vampire Hunting

Living Geography

While looking for something else, I came across a resource I wrote quite a while back now for the RGS website. I worked with Ralitsa Hiteva, a PhD candidate who was exploring the development of energy in Bulgaria. The theme was Energy Security. Resources are still here on the RGS website.

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Should financial aid be based on family wealth, rather than income alone?

The Hechinger Report

In a world where a person’s decision to go to college depends on their ability to pay for college, money is everything. And in a country where access to money is wildly unequal across racial and ethnic groups, whether a family’s financial resources go beyond a biweekly paycheck and include home equity, retirement savings or hefty gifts from older relatives can make a significant difference in access to higher education, according to a new analysis from the Institute of Higher Education Policy.

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What’s Your Summer Reading?

Teaching American History

Summer’s here! Time to do that reading you put off during the school year. We asked teacher friends what they plan to read during the summer vacation. Most will delve into the complex and fascinating American story, reading books that will enrich their teaching for next year. If you are still looking for good reads, here are some ideas. Some MAHG students and graduates of the program now have time to read books recommended by fellow students and professors.

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What really happened back then, in 1918?

Life and Landscapes

WHAT REALLY HAPPENED BACK THEN, IN 1918? 1918. With so many people moving around. It was a brand new world, at war with itself. When it should have been looking to fight somewhere else. That World War started because of the death of Franz Ferdinand. By the time it was over, nine million soldiers were dead. Maybe ten million civilians. And how many more came back limping or blind?

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Neanderthals and Humans Interbred for 7,000 Years, Study Suggests

Anthropology.net

Neanderthal genes present in modern humans may have been introduced through an extended period of interbreeding starting around 47,000 years ago and lasting nearly 7,000 years, according to new research. New research indicates that Neanderthals (front skeleton) interbred with humans (back skeleton) starting 47,000 years ago, continuing for nearly 7,000 years.

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Protecting Free Speech, Promoting Free Inquiry

Institute for Citizens & Scholars

Institute for Citizens & Scholars president Raj Vinnakota writes an op-ed in Inside Higher Ed on five ways to protect free expression and a constructive academic environment on college campuses.

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Teaching Geography Editorial Board vacancy

Living Geography

Here's an exciting opportunity for someone to be involved in the work of the Geographical Association. Information from GA website: Teaching Geography is the GA’s professional journal for secondary school geography teachers and is published three times per year. It contains articles on themes of interest for geography teachers and recent articles have included subject updates for teaching plate tectonics, encouraging student reading, using and embedding GIS, and decolonising the curriculum.

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Read Aloud Podcast: Enhancing Literacy and Learning Outside the Classroom with StoryWalks

Heinemann Blog

Have you ever thought about what literacy might look like outside of the classroom?

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Silenced Confirmation Hearings: Women and People of Color Interrupted More

Political Science Now

In the APSA Public Scholarship Program, graduate students in political science produce summaries of new research in the American Political Science Review. This piece, written by Irem B. A. Örsel , covers the new article by Christina L. Boyd, Paul M. Collins, Jr., Lori A. Ringhand, Gender, Race, and Interruptions at Supreme Court Confirmation Hearings.

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On Mentorship, Sponsorship, and Collaboratorship

All Things Pedagogical

I am writing this blog this week with a heavy conflicted heart, having just come back from a great conference experience to have to make a difficult life decision which was sadly absolutely necessary (more on this in the coming weeks). I am focusing this week's blog on something I have been thinking so much about lately which is mentorship and leadership models that allow for mentorship opportunities of different kinds.