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US History Vocabulary Review Activity That Rocks!

Active History Teacher

US History vocabulary review can be fun and student centered! Using the game Envelope Races, students can review US History vocabulary in a competitive way. Do your students struggle with US History vocabulary? If you have taught History for any length of time, you know that some vocabulary is just HARD to learn, apply and remember. Popular Sovereignty anyone?

History 195
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How To Connect Schools And Communities Using Technology

TeachThought

How To Connect Schools And Communities Using Technology by Terry Heick It’s possible that there is no time in the history of education that our systems of educating have been so out of touch with the communities. Growing populations, shifting communities, and increasingly inwardly-focused schools all play a role. In light of the access of modern technology, social media, and new learning models that reconfigure the time and place learning happens, it doesn’t have to be that way.

Artifacts 152
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OPINION: Everything I learned about how to teach reading turned out to be wrong

The Hechinger Report

When I first started teaching middle school, I did everything my university prep program told me to do in what’s known as the “workshop model.” I let kids choose their books. I determined their independent reading levels and organized my classroom library according to reading difficulty. I then modeled various reading skills, like noticing the details of the imagery in a text, and asked my students to practice doing likewise during independent reading time.

Teaching 120
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The Power of Where

Living Geography

That's the title of a new book by Jack Dangermond in association with the wider GIS community. A description: The Power of Where presents the visionary concepts of Jack Dangermond, cofounder of Esri®, the world’s leading mapping software company. With a foreword by bestselling author and writer for The Atlantic, James Fallows, it’s filled with the latest web maps, illustrations, and real-life stories from a vibrant global community of geographic information systems (GIS) users.

Civics 98
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The Ancient Human Genome of Denisovans: A New Revelation

Anthropology.net

A remarkable study has brought to light the most ancient human genome sequenced to date, belonging to a Denisovan male from 200,000 years ago. This significant find, presented by population geneticist Stéphane Peyrégne at the annual meeting of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, has profound implications for understanding our extinct cousins and their interactions with other archaic humans.

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Teaching the Industrial Revolution Inventions

Active History Teacher

Teaching the industrial revolution inventions can be so boring! Our textbooks often put the industrial revolution inventions in multiple places and they are often just a sentence or two! Getting students to process the impact of the industrial revolution inventions in a meaningful way is always my goal. When I put this lesson together, I wanted to get kids up and moving.

Teaching 195
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Teaching FAMILIES AS THEY REALLY ARE

Norton Learning - Sociology

Virginia E. Rutter is Professor Emerita of Sociology at Framingham State University (MA), where she continues to teach classes on families and methods. She’s a senior scholar at the Council on Contemporary Families.

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Discount on RGS GIS courses for GA members

Living Geography

There is now an opportunity for GA members to get a discount on GIS courses which are run by the Royal Geographical Society / ESRI UK. If you ask many teachers what they want training in, they often say either fieldwork / NEAs or GIS. This has been the case for quite some time now. It's also important to say that the GIS skills acquired need to be introduced to students in a co-ordinated way, with progression from the Early Years up to 'A' level (and beyond).

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Radical Portraits of Working Class Women Writers – Laura Maw

Women's History Network

Virginia Woolf’s maxim in her now-classic polemic was this: ‘a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction’.[1] But what if a writer did not have access to these resources – this independent wealth, this private space? What, then, might her fiction look like?

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What aspects of teaching should remain human?

The Hechinger Report

ATLANTA — Science teacher Daniel Thompson circulated among his sixth graders at Ron Clark Academy on a recent spring morning, spot checking their work and leading them into discussions about the day’s lessons on weather and water. He had a helper: As Thompson paced around the class, peppering them with questions, he frequently turned to a voice-activated AI to summon apps and educational videos onto large-screen smartboards.

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Human Hunting and the Extinction of Megafauna: A 50,000-Year Review

Anthropology.net

The debate over what caused the extinction of many large mammals, birds, and reptiles over the past 50,000 years has been ongoing for decades. Were humans or climate change responsible for these losses? Recent research 1 suggests a compelling answer. Defining Megafauna and the Extinction Crisis Megafauna refers to animals weighing at least 45 kilograms.

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Digital Promise Reflections: 5 EdTech Insights from ISTELive 24

Digital Promise

Digital Promise leaders reflect on top insights and learnings around education technology from the ISTELive 2024 conference.

EdTech 115
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When Students Are Absent, Do Their Relationships With Teachers Suffer?

ED Surge

Students are missing a lot of classes. Chronic absenteeism, when a student misses at least 10 percent of the school year — which includes missing school for any reason, and not just unexcused absences — nearly doubled from 2019 to 2022. In May, the White House flagged chronic absenteeism as a national “challenge,” pointing toward its connection to lower reading and graduation levels.

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Dr Lottie Whalen explores the lives of the Greenwich Village ‘smock colony’

Women's History Network

Please do join us TOMORROW for a fascinating paper from Dr Lottie Whalen on ‘the smock colony’. Identifiable by their patterned smock dresses, sandals, and bobbed hair, this community of creative women lived, worked, and agitated for change in Greenwich Village in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

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PROOF POINTS: Asian American students lose more points in an AI essay grading study — but researchers don’t know why

The Hechinger Report

When ChatGPT was released to the public in November 2022, advocates and watchdogs warned about the potential for racial bias. The new large language model was created by harvesting 300 billion words from books, articles and online writing, which include racist falsehoods and reflect writers’ implicit biases. Biased training data is likely to generate biased advice, answers and essays.

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Teacher Experts From Across the U.S. Share Their Insights and Experience at the National Education Summit

Smithsonian Voices | Smithsonian Education

Among the speakers featured at this summer's Smithsonian National Education Summit, classroom teachers from across grade levels and subject areas will share transferrable practices and insightful strategies with thousands of educator participants

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Can Texas Secede?

History Havoc

Having lived in Texas for a long time, this is my home and I absolutely love it here. However, there is one thing that sticks in my crawl so to speak. Can we stop with the Texas secession talk? First of all, legally and constitutionally the state cannot secede. Plus it would be ludicrous. Texas v. White (1869) This is the Supreme Court case that set the legal president that does not allow a state to secede.

History 75
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The Real CSI

ShortCutsTV

The Centre for Social Investigation – not to be confused with the long-running TV series – was established at Nuffield College in 2014 as an “interdisciplinary research programme” with the aim of addressing “contemporary social issues of public interest”.

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Federal Rule Change May Undermine ‘Inclusive Access’ Textbook Models

ED Surge

There’s a new battle raging in the long-running war over costly college textbooks , one that may strike a serious blow to the textbook subscription programs promoted by publishers and criticized by student advocates. The U.S. Department of Education recently started reevaluating financial aid regulations from 2016 that effectively allow colleges to automatically bill students for books and supplies as long as those materials meet criteria that include being sold at below competitive market rates

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OPINION: School counselors are scarce, but AI could play an important role in helping them reach more students

The Hechinger Report

If we are to believe the current rapturous cheerleading around artificial intelligence, education is about to be transformed. Digital educators, alert and available at all times, will soon replace their human counterparts and feed students with concentrated personalized content. It’s reminiscent of a troubling experiment from the 1960s , immortalized in one touching image: an infant monkey, clearly scared, clutching a crude cloth replica of the real mother it has been deprived of.

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The first Australians were Lévy walkers

Strange Maps

If you’re a band of hunter-gatherers entering a new land, you don’t move in straight lines — you progress in a pattern called “Lévy walks”. Where you go, and how quickly, is determined by the lay of the land, and how it changes over time. Sahul, before it shrank and fragmented Those two insights are the pillars upon which Australian and French researchers have built a new model for mapping how pre-agricultural humans occupied new territory.

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Stephen Blenkinsop: GIS, Climate Action in the North East, and a Passion for Tea and Doctor Who

Geogramblings

The Climate Ambassadors scheme is a national initiative aimed at empowering young people to take action on climate change. The scheme has nine regional hubs across England, each led by a dedicated team of experts. In the North East, the hub is led by Stephen Blenkinsop, a Senior Lecturer at Newcastle University with a passion for tea and a lifelong love of Doctor Who.

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Let's Talk Math! Purposeful Math with Kent Haines and Steve Leinwand

Heinemann Blog

What do we want students to get out of math class? Proficiency? A love of math? Job prospects? Kent and Steve discuss.

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What Future Teachers Can Tell Us About Why People Enter the Profession Today

ED Surge

For the last year, EdSurge has been showcasing students enrolled in teacher preparation programs to understand who is going into teaching today — and why. In each profile, we hand the mic over to an aspiring educator, letting them explain, in their own words, what drew them into this career path and why they’ve stuck with it. The series, called “ America’s Future Teachers ,” comes at a time when the teaching profession is in turmoil.

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Teaching word problems in the early grades

The Hechinger Report

Why do so many young children struggle with word problems in math? Researchers believe one reason is that students often learn to interpret word problems by focusing on key words such as “and” or “total.” Relying too much on key words can lead students astray, particularly because word problems get more complex as students go through school. Because these types of math problems require so many skills beyond number manipulation – like reading and executive function, for example – excelling at wor

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How Text-to-Speech Technology is Breaking Barriers for Math Learners

Digital Promise

The post How Text-to-Speech Technology is Breaking Barriers for Math Learners appeared first on Digital Promise.

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Londoner Annie Risner Supporting Education Settings in the Charge for Climate Action

Geogramblings

The Climate Ambassadors scheme, a national initiative empowering young people to tackle climate change, has nine regional hubs across England. Leading the London hub is Annie Risner, a true Londoner with a diverse background and a deep-rooted passion for community engagement and creative expression. Annie’s journey, from growing up in Hackney and Kent to living in five different countries, has instilled in her a unique perspective on the interconnectedness of people and the environment.

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Vox series on Indigenous Knowledge(s)

Living Geography

Several exam specifications are making a real shift towards including some alternative types of knowledge, which in some areas has real power, but tends to be ignored in favour of knowledge from a 'Western' perspective. Indigenous knowledge is particularly important in this respect. A new series on Vox is exploring these knowledge s - particularly in relation to extreme weather.

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What All High Schools Can Draw From Career and Technical Education Programs

ED Surge

My colleagues feverishly jotted down notes as one of my students, Ethan, moved through his presentation on how educators can more intentionally use AI in their classes. Ethan, a high school junior studying to become a secondary history teacher in our Academy for Teaching and Learning, was presenting findings from his extensive research to the staff at our school.

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How to Build Knowledge During Whole-Group Literacy Time

Heinemann Blog

Whole-group literacy often involves the whole group of students, sitting on a rug, engaging with a story read aloud by the teacher. During this time, students ask questions, think deeply about the text, and participate in purposeful conversation as they turn-and-talk with their peers. What takes this learning further are curated, authentic, and meaningful text sets with a theme that is meant to build knowledge around a certain topic.

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Can AI Be Ethical? Understanding What This Means for the Education Sector

Digital Promise

The post Can AI Be Ethical? Understanding What This Means for the Education Sector appeared first on Digital Promise.

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July 10 Update: Updated Assessment Sharing

TCI

Feature Spotlight: Updated Assessment Sharing Manage your assessments with ease. Our latest update lets you control who can access your shared tests. Easily unshare tests with district colleagues to maintain flexibility and control over your resources. You can unshare an assessment in two ways. First, you can find your shared assessment in the Assessment Library.

Library 52
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A night on the Toon

Living Geography

Up to Newcastle overnight to give the Cath White Memorial Lecture , which was a real privilege. The weather was not ideal for my usual exploration, but I managed a bit of a wander. My talk was recorded, and may be made available on the YouTube channel of the GA Tyne and Wear Branch. I spoke about some of the things that have kept me in the classroom for so long.

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Dr Lottie Whalen – ‘Postcards from the Smock Colony’ – 10 July 2024, 4pm BST

Women's History Network

Final reminder to sign up for our seminar, taking place this afternoon at 4pm BST, featuring Dr Lottie Whalen’s paper ‘Postcards from the Smock Colony: Jessie Tarbox Beals’ photographs of Bohemian Greenwich Village’ Sign up details cane be found here We look forward to seeing you there!

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Summer 2024 Teacher Workshops at Heinemann

Heinemann Blog

Amplify your professional development this summer with events at Heinemann. Join some of our authors for half-day, full-day, and multiday virtual workshops. Use Code PROFBKS30E on the Heinemann site for 30% off the event-related texts! *Additional dates to be added if the event is filled.

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Neolithic Egalitarianism: A Unique Society of Dietary Equality

Anthropology.net

Recent archaeological findings 1 challenge the long-held stereotypes of ancient societies, revealing evidence of a Neolithic community where men, women, and immigrants enjoyed equal access to food. This discovery, based on the remains of a society in what is now Valais, Switzerland, offers a glimpse into a community practicing dietary equality, a stark contrast to other known Neolithic societies.

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IB Diploma Psychology Virtual Summit

Psychology Sorted

26-28 July. Recommended for IB Diploma Psychology teachers – all levels of experience.