2024

article thumbnail

11 Artificial Intelligence (AI) Tools to Support Effective Teaching and Leadership

A Principal's Reflections

It goes without saying that AI is a hot topic of conversation in education circles and beyond. In the beginning, I was a skeptic myself, but now I use it to support my professional work, especially when I coach leaders. While there are legitimate concerns and anything generated by AI needs to be fully vetted, the most profound benefit is how it can save educators precious time.

article thumbnail

Yes, Your School Librarian Can Do That (and More)

Cult of Pedagogy

Listen to the interview with Karina Quilantan-Garza, Lauren Mobley, K.C. Boyd, and Barbara Paciotti ( transcript ): Sponsored by WeVideo and The Modern Classrooms Project I used to think librarians did three things: (1) organize and fiercely protect large collections of books, (2) check those books out to visitors, and (3) shush people. As libraries started to house more technology, I added a fourth role: manage and protect the tech.

Library 363
educators

Sign Up for our Newsletter

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

article thumbnail

3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st-Century Student

TeachThought

3 Knowledge Domains For Teaching And Learning by TeachThought Staff Thinking in the 21st century is just different. That doesn’t […] The post 3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st-Century Student appeared first on TeachThought.

Teaching 333
article thumbnail

How Academic Historians can be Useful to K-12 Teachers

NCHE

After Jessica Ellison invited me to participate in a conversation about how academic historians might be of use to K-12 teachers, I did a little research: I asked teachers at our state social studies council what they most needed for their work. The answers were clear: time and confidence, they said. The two needs are related, for there is simply not enough time for those who teach multiple classes, often in multiple disciplines, to stay on top of the flood of specialized writing, to be conf

K-12 312
article thumbnail

3 Reasons Teachers Should Use the Playlist Model

Catlin Tucker

Let’s start with a quick review of the playlist, or individual rotation, model for those who have not heard of it. A playlist is a sequence of learning activities designed to move students toward a desired result. Most playlists culminate in a performance task or artifact intended to demonstrate students’ ability to transfer or apply what they learned working through the playlist.

Artifacts 176
article thumbnail

Elevating Innovation: Conference Reflections and Takeaways from Educators

Digital Promise

In November 2023, Digital Promise and Verizon Innovative Learning hosted the second annual Elevating Innovation Virtual Conference. The event attracted more than 3,000 participants from across the country and around the world. Attendees had the opportunity to learn about the latest educational trends, emerging technologies, and innovative strategies shaping education directly from education and edtech experts like Girls Who Code founder Reshma Saujani; Future Ready Schools director of innovation

EdTech 163

More Trending

article thumbnail

It’s Time to Ditch the Idea of Edtech Disruption. But What Comes Next?

ED Surge

COVID-19 was edtech’s big moment, and while digital tools kept learning going for many families and schools, they also faltered. A great deal of edtech purchases went unused , equity gaps widened , and teachers and students were burned out. Combined with sobering reports on the persistent lack of strong evidence for edtech , it’s no wonder why the notion of using technology to “fix broken schools” has fallen out of most startup pitch decks and education TED Talks.

EdTech 137
article thumbnail

Teaching About Famine and Irish History on St. Patrick’s Day

Zinn Education Project

A mural on Whiterock Road in Belfast commemorating the Irish famine. Source: Public domain Too often, textbooks present famines as natural phenomena. They are not. As Gaza moves closer toward famine, it is not hard to see its causes. As Josep Borrell, the European Union foreign policy chief said recently : This is a humanitarian crisis, which is not a natural disaster.

History 145
article thumbnail

PROOF POINTS: Learning science might help kids read better

The Hechinger Report

A growing chorus of education researchers, pundits and “science of reading” advocates are calling for young children to be taught more about the world around them. It’s an indirect way of teaching reading comprehension. The theory is that what we grasp from what we read depends on whether we can hook it to concepts and topics that we already know. Natalie Wexler’s 2019 best-selling book, The Knowledge Gap , championed knowledge-building curricula and more schools around the country, from Baltimo

article thumbnail

Writing Instruction Considerations

Heinemann Blog

Carl Anderson and Matt Glover are the authors of How to Become a Better Writing Teacher r eleased in Fall 2023. Join them this summer for a two-day virtual institute on How to Become a Better Writing Teacher. Register here !

article thumbnail

11 Ideas for Primary Math Stations

A Principal's Reflections

A few weeks back, I shared ideas on ELA stations for primary students after this was brought up during a coaching cycle with one of my schools. Upon reflection, I decided to do the same with math. Creating math stations for primary students can be a fun and effective way to introduce them to basic math concepts through hands-on activities. These stations can help develop their understanding of numbers, shapes, patterns, and measurements in an interactive and engaging manner.

Teaching 416
article thumbnail

Why Students Give You the Blank Stare, and What to Do About It

Cult of Pedagogy

Listen to the interview with Blake Harvard: Sponsored by Listenwise and Khan Academy Kids Please allow me to describe an all-too-common situation that has occurred in probably every teacher’s classroom: You teach your heart out. Really just knock it out of the park: explaining, describing, providing examples, modeling … you know, all the things we’re taught to do during instruction.

article thumbnail

What Is Mistake Literacy? The Research Of Learning Through Failure

TeachThought

Though it is perhaps not intuitive, Richland et al. (2009) found that error generation is positively correlated to enhanced memory. The post What Is Mistake Literacy? The Research Of Learning Through Failure appeared first on TeachThought.

Research 322
article thumbnail

Was the “Odyssey” originally set in the Baltic?

Strange Maps

Had he not wrapped himself in a discarded cloak, Ulysses would have frozen to death at Troy. Our hero’s host, Eumaeus the swineherd, hears the story and gets the hint: He loans Ulysses a cloak, because again, the night is freezing cold. This part of Homer’s Odyssey doesn’t sound very Mediterranean. Sprinkled through Homer’s twin epics, Felice Vinci spotted a heap of similar anecdotes that pointed away from the traditional setting of the Iliad , an account of the Trojan War, and the Odyssey

article thumbnail

The Week That Was In 505

Moler's Musing

This week, I wanted to focus on the second part of our Revolution and Reform unit, specifically on the topic of abolitionism. With only 28 or 29 days of school left, it’s crucial that I carefully select the most important content to cover. Although I would love to delve into all aspects of reform movements, time constraints simply won’t allow for it.

article thumbnail

Recommendations for Supporting Safe Teacher Exploration of AI and New Technologies

Digital Promise

The post Recommendations for Supporting Safe Teacher Exploration of AI and New Technologies appeared first on Digital Promise.

160
160
article thumbnail

‘Ane good receipt for the mother in trouball’: The anatomy of a seventeenth-century Scottish medical book – Roslyn Potter

Women's History Network

The year is 1649 and Lady Jean Wemyss has a headache. Since paracetamol won’t be invented for another several hundred years, Jean reaches for the next best thing: a handwritten recipe book. The cure, written down in her mother’s neat hand, suggests the use of some trusted betony water.

136
136
article thumbnail

What Brings Gen Z to the Library?

ED Surge

Gen Zers, born between 1997 and 2012, spend a lot of time online, consuming and creating digital content. Ninety-two percent check social media daily. But they still like print, and they still like to go to the library, according to a survey of Gen Z and Millennial public library use and media consumption released by the American Library Association last fall.

Library 144
article thumbnail

Tinker v. Des Moines: Youth Rights in a Time of Plausible Genocide

Zinn Education Project

By Mary Beth Tinker This February 24th marks 55 years since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Tinker v. Des Moines that “state operated schools may not be enclaves of totalitarianism” and that public school students are “persons under our constitution, possessed of fundamental rights,” as Justice Abe Fortas wrote for the 7–2 majority. Mary Beth Tinker and her brother, John, display two black armbands, the objects of the U.S.

Archiving 138
article thumbnail

Young children misbehave. Some are suspended for acting their age

The Hechinger Report

JOHNSBURG, Ill. — A group of fifth grade boys trailed into the conference room in the front office of Johnsburg Elementary School and sat at the table, their feet dangling from the chairs. “It was brought to my attention yesterday that there was an incident at football,” Principal Bridget Belcastro said to the group. The students tried to explain: One boy pushed a kid, another jumped on the ball, and yet another jumped on the boy on the ball.

article thumbnail

What’s Behind the Evolution of Neanderthal Portraits

Sapiens

Since the 1800s, Neanderthal depictions have evolved not only with changing science but also due to social views. An archaeologist explains why visualizations of our evolutionary cousins matter. NEANDERTHALS’ FIRST PORTRAITS In 1888, a few decades after the first scientifically named Homo neanderthalensis fossil surfaced, anthropologist and anatomist Hermann Schaaffhausen made a portrait of what that Neanderthal might have looked like in life.

Museum 136
article thumbnail

Prepare for Fall Multi Day seminars!

Teaching American History

Discussion of primary documents. A supportive and engaged group of educators. Historic locations. Free professional development. What more could you ask for? Applications open soon for our Fall 2024 Multi Day seminars ! We are hosting seminars on a variety of topics in American history and politics. The application will be open April 8-April 30. Some of our topics include: The Underground Railroad at The Underground Railroad Heritage Center in Niagara Falls, NY West Coast Immigration at the Ang

article thumbnail

Two Programs with Fresh Solutions to the Teacher Shortage

Cult of Pedagogy

Listen to the interview with Kimberly Eckert ( transcript ): Sponsored by Edge•U Badges and EVERFI We’ve been hearing about a teacher shortage for a while now, certainly since the pandemic, and multiple studies show that many states are seeing record high numbers of teacher turnovers and vacancies. In 2022, we explored some of the reasons teachers are leaving the classroom , so we won’t go into them here.

article thumbnail

Levels Of Integration For Critical Thinking

TeachThought

How can you teach critical thinking? This framework offers a way to integrate critical thinking in your classroom. The post Levels Of Integration For Critical Thinking appeared first on TeachThought.

article thumbnail

Shipbreaking in Bangladesh: The Labor of Living with Toxic Development

Anthropology News

Sitakunda, Bangladesh, is one of the world’s largest sites for shipbreaking. The industry is a motor of national development, but once dismantled, ships release hazardous materials that affect everyone in the area. Camelia Dewan writes about the life and labor of workers and fishermen on the beaches where ships are sent to die. Bangladeshi workers “cut” through ships run aground on intertidal beaches with hand-held gas torches.

article thumbnail

Westarctica: The micronation with a real-world purpose

Strange Maps

Marie Byrd Land, in Antarctica, was named after the wife of the American explorer Richard E. Byrd Jr. He must not have liked her very much, because even by the harsh standards of the South Pole, this land is inaccessible and inhospitable, cold, and unforgiving. The desolation of Marie Byrd Land. Image taken by NASA during Operation IceBridge (2018/19), the largest airborne survey of Earth’s polar ice ever flown. ( Credit : NASA/Michael Studinger, public domain).

article thumbnail

8 New Districts Join the League of Innovative Schools

Digital Promise

From Pennsylvania to California, these eight districts are the latest to join the network of 150 forward-thinking education leaders.

Education 157
article thumbnail

The Week That Was In 505

Moler's Musing

This was the last week before Spring Break and I needed to finish the westward expansion unit. The main focus of this unit was having students understand how we acquired territories, the implications of manifest destiny, and the motivations and legacies of groups that went west. A short and simple 3 week unit. Monday – Explore Trail of Tears Tuesday – Inspirations to Go West Wednesday – Groups That Went West Thursday – Dividing the Pie Friday – Quizizz , Bento Box M

Artifacts 129
article thumbnail

Is It Time for a National Conversation About Eliminating Letter Grades?

ED Surge

As Joshua Eyler was researching a book on what brain science tells us about how to improve teaching , one issue kept coming up as an underlying problem: The way schools and colleges grade student work is at odds with effective teaching. The science says kids need to feel free to try things and fail, and that the deepest learning comes when failure happens and the student figures out how to course-correct, Eyler says.

Tradition 136
article thumbnail

Two Updates on the Value of Vaccines

Marginal Revolution

1) From the recent annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene (abstract 6949) we learn that the R21/Matrix-M malaria vaccine maintained it’s efficacy over 4 seasons. …Importantly, maintained high efficacy over four malaria seasons with only four doses is demonstrated, with no concerns to date of rebound in those who have not received repeated booster doses of the malaria vaccine.

Economics 134
article thumbnail

PROOF POINTS: Controversies within the science of reading

The Hechinger Report

Four meta-analyses conclude that it’s more effective to teach phonemic awareness with letters, not as an oral-only exercise. Credit: Allison Shelley for EDU Educators around the country have embraced the “science of reading” in their classrooms, but that doesn’t mean there’s a truce in the reading wars. In fact, controversies are emerging about an important but less understood aspect of learning to read: phonemic awareness.

Tutoring 145
article thumbnail

For the Love of Cats in Turkey

Sapiens

On a visit to feline-friendly Turkey, an anthropologist considers what long-standing practices of caring for cats reveal about human societies. ✽ While visiting eastern Turkey to climb Mount Ararat, I discovered a nice cafe called Ru Sahaf in the town of Doğubayazıt. I had arrived days before the hike and was looking for a place to work remotely. The cafe had nice chairs, jazz music, good coffee, and decent internet: a perfect spot.

article thumbnail

Reading Collaborative Life Writing in the Memoirs of Princess Daschkaw (1840) – Alexis Wolf

Women's History Network

In 1840, Memoirs of Princess Daschkaw, Lady of Honour to Catherine II was published in England. The two-volume text included the personal memoirs of Russian noblewoman Ekaterina Dashkova (1743-1810), one of the most powerful, well-known and misunderstood women figures of the Enlightenment.

126
126
article thumbnail

Building Better Collaboration Between Families and Schools

Cult of Pedagogy

Listen to my interview with Nawal Qarooni ( transcript ): Sponsored by Listenwise and Khan Academy Kids This page contains Amazon Affiliate and Bookshop.org links. When you make a purchase through these links, Cult of Pedagogy gets a small percentage of the sale at no extra cost to you. What’s the difference between Amazon and Bookshop.org? When I am in spaces where people talk about solutions to some of our biggest problems — poverty, crime, addiction, environmental decline — one theme th

Pedagogy 359