May, 2024

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Unpacking the Backpack

A Principal's Reflections

The social media landscape has changed quite dramatically when I first arrived in the space back in 2009. To put things in perspective, Instagram and TikTok were years away from existing, and Facebook was the dominant tool of choice. At that time, Twitter was emerging as the preferred space for educators to connect, and blogs were the go-to source for relevant ideas and strategies.

K-12 355
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Strategies To Help Students Retain What You Taught Them

TeachThought

15 Reflection Strategies To Help Students Retain What You Just Taught Them by Terry Heick Reflection is a natural part of learning. We all think about new experiences–the camping on the car ride home, the mistakes made in a game, or the emotions felt while finishing a long-term project that’s taken months to complete. Below I’ve shared 15 strategies for students to reflect on their learning.

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Not Just for Math: A Tiered System of Learning Supports for Any Subject

Cult of Pedagogy

Listen to the interview with Sarah Riggs Johnson and Nate Wolkenhauer: Sponsored by Studyo and Scholastic Magazines+ This post was co-written by Nate Wolkenhauer. This isn’t really about math. Well, it is, but you could apply it to any subject area. I teach in a small 6-12 independent school with my colleague and friend, Nate Wolkenhauer. Nate teaches Pre-Algebra and Algebra 1 to 6th, 7th, and 8th graders.

K-12 292
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Is email feedback a waste of time?

A Psychology Teacher Writes

Photo by cottonbro studio on Pexels.com Teacher chat on social media is at its best when there is healthy discussion around how best we can do our job, grounded in mutual respect. That doesn’t mean an echo-chamber in which we all congratulate each other on what a marvellous job we’re doing, rather that there is a discourse which pushes our thinking, makes us reflect on what we’re doing and how we might make it even better.

Cultures 162
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Checks and Balances

Passion for Social Studies

If you think about kids sharing a new toy, there is usually some type of conflict. For instance, both want the toy, but there is only one, so they must share. This disagreement leads to arguing, fighting, and tears. Honestly, this same situation can occur within the US Government. If two branches want control over the same issue, it can lead to a mountain of problems.

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Eduprotocols Field Guide: Elementary Edition

Catlin Tucker

In the newest episode of The Balance , I chat with Ben Cogswell and Jenn Dean about their new book, EduProtocol Field Guide: Primary Edition. These two are a powerhouse of passion when it comes to educating young learners! Ben is a kindergarten teacher in Salinas, California. He was awarded Teacher of the Year, Computer Using Educators (CUE) Blended and Online Educator of the Year, CUE’s Gold Disk Award, and KSBW’s Crystal Apple Award.

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The Never-ending Upgrade: Why Constant Growth is the Key to Success

A Principal's Reflections

While I enjoy keynoting and facilitating workshops, it is through a coaching lens that I get to see how teachers and administrators are implementing innovative learning strategies with fidelity. Through their actions, I can collect evidence to show efficacy while curating exemplars I can share in my presentations. No matter where I go, I get the same message from educators on their desire for practical strategies.

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A Conversation About School Choice

Cult of Pedagogy

Listen to the interview with Cara Fitzpatrick ( transcript ): Sponsored by WeVideo and The Modern Classrooms Project This page contains Amazon Affiliate and Bookshop.org links. When you make a purchase through these links, Cult of Pedagogy gets a small percentage of the sale at no extra cost to you. What’s the difference between Amazon and Bookshop.org?

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Attention Contagion

The Effortful Educator

As a teacher, you know about this phenomenon, but you probably didn’t know its name. Attention contagion. You’ve seen it in your classroom: one student is off task and that inattention seems to spread throughout the room. One student with their head down leads to three or four doing the same. One student off task on their laptop leads to a handful all doing the same.

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Teacher Well-Being Depends on Workload, School Climate and Feeling Supported

ED Surge

In the two decades that Jennifer Merriman has been in education, she’s seen a tendency in the field to solve problems by piling more tasks onto teachers who are already straining under the weight of their workloads. That ultimately works against what researchers say is one of the most important pillars of a school’s success: the well-being of its teachers.

K-12 138
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‘Screwdrivers, Scissors and Pliers’: The Electrical Association for Women in Interwar Scotland – Eleanor Peters

Women's History Network

2024 marks the centenary of the founding of the Electrical Association for Women (EAW), an organisation that urged women to equip themselves with pliers, scissors, and screwdrivers and learn how to maintain and fix their electrical appliances – no repairman required!

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Quantifying Innovative Practices

A Principal's Reflections

Lately, I've been giving a lot of thought to effectiveness, and this has been mirrored in my writing and work as a coach. Reflecting on my time as a principal at my previous school, I recall the successful shift towards digitalization and incorporating innovative practices. Our main goal was to demonstrate tangible improvements rather than just discuss them.

Artifacts 260
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PROOF POINTS: AI essay grading is already as ‘good as an overburdened’ teacher, but researchers say it needs more work

The Hechinger Report

Grading papers is hard work. “I hate it,” a teacher friend confessed to me. And that’s a major reason why middle and high school teachers don’t assign more writing to their students. Even an efficient high school English teacher who can read and evaluate an essay in 20 minutes would spend 3,000 minutes, or 50 hours, grading if she’s teaching six classes of 25 students each.

Research 136
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Taylor's on her way. here are some ideas

Living Geography

The ERAS tour is heading for the UK soon, and there's plenty of geography to be had in exploring the economic and environmental impact of the tour and associated music as well as the interesting cultural implications of the event: the demographics of a typical crowd etc. The tour is said to have a major impact on an entire country's economy when it comes into town.

Geography 132
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2024 Newcombe Fellows

Institute for Citizens & Scholars

Twenty-two Fellows have been named to the 2024 class of the Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship, administered by the Institute for Citizens & Scholars.

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What Would It Take to Attract Gen Z to Teaching?

ED Surge

With interest in the teaching profession waning and enrollment in teacher preparation programs reaching historic lows, all eyes are on the next crop of students — tomorrow’s prospective educators — to make up the deficit. Today’s high school and college students are part of Generation Z, a group of people who range in age from 12 to 28, and have characteristics, attitudes and aspirations that distinguish them from prior generations.

Teaching 135
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How 3 Districts Are Reimagining High School and the Future of Work

Digital Promise

Three innovative school districts are reimagining the high school experience to better prepare students for college and career.

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2025 Bernice L. Fox Classics Writing Contest

Society for Classical Studies

2025 Bernice L. Fox Classics Writing Contest kskordal Thu, 05/23/2024 - 10:37 Image The Bernice L. Fox Classics Writing Contest Sponsored by the Department of Classics at Monmouth College Topic: One or More Figures from Classical History, Literature, or Mythology as the Next President of the United States, or Running for the Office Deadline: March 15, 2025, emailed to rsimmons@monmouthcollege.edu Contest Parameters and Judging: This contest is open to any student enrolled full-time in high schoo

History 124
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The story of how one college abruptly closed — and kept everyone in the dark

The Hechinger Report

The students were the last to know. On April 29 – just a week before finals – Wells College announced that it would close. The last-minute decision by the 156-year-old liberal arts college in upstate New York sent students rushing to find new colleges for the fall. And it threw newly accepted students, who had already put down deposits, into a frantic scramble to see if the colleges they had turned down would take them back.

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ON THE PODCAST: Writing as Healing with Barry Lane

Heinemann Blog

Welcome to Writing as Healing, a Heinemann-podcast series focused on writing as a tool, to increase healing in students and teachers. We know that academic learning doesn't happen without social and emotional support, and writing as a key literacy, is uniquely positioned in every classroom to do both. How can writing help students see they are not alone?

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Fish and Chips resource

Living Geography

A cross posting from my Geography Teaching blog. I've developed this activity for Year 7, as part of our unit on food geographies called 'Food for Thought'. It's shared here without commentary or additional resources, which we've developed to help steer the lesson. It explores the rising price of food by focussing on one meal - a classic of UK food culture.

Geography 115
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What Brain Science Says About How to Better Teach Teenagers

ED Surge

Ellen Galinsky has been on a seven-year quest to understand what brain science says about how to better teach and parent adolescent children. The past few years have seen advancements in our understanding of this time — where the brain is going through almost as much change as during the earliest years of a child’s life. In the past, Galinsky says, researchers and educators have focused too much on portraying the emotional turmoil and risky decision-making that is typical in adolescence as negat

Teaching 128
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Six Tips for Districts to Avoid the Next Funding Cliff

Digital Promise

Updated Technology Sustainability Toolkit helps districts plan their budgets with ending of COVID relief funds.

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Baltoscandia: The geopolitical ghost that may just have a future

Strange Maps

You’ve probably never heard of Baltoscandia. It sounds like a made-up country, and that’s because it is a made-up country. But even without a government, a flag, and most other trappings of actual nationhood, Baltoscandia has a history, a raison d’être , and perhaps even a future. Narva Castle in Estonia (left) facing the medieval fortifications of Ivangorod in Russia (right).

Geography 112
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Suspended for ‘other’: When states don’t share why kids are being kicked out of school

The Hechinger Report

Every time educators suspend students from school, they have to select a formal reason. In Texas, they have 42 options to pick from — fighting, school-related gang violence, even arson. Despite those choices, 88 percent of suspensions in Texas last year were marked in state reports as a “violation of student code of conduct” with no additional detail.

Research 124
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Teaching the Tulsa Massacre

Zinn Education Project

During the Tulsa Massacre, deputized white rioters murdered hundreds of Black residents and destroyed their homes, businesses, schools, and community centers. This took place from May 31 to June 1, 1921, in the thriving African American community of Greenwood in Tulsa, Oklahoma. This is one of countless massacres in U.S. history designed to maintain white supremacy that receive little attention in corporate curricula.

Teaching 111
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Professional Development or Summer Camp for Teachers? MAHG is both!

Teaching American History

Join us this summer for the best professional development TAH offers! We still have room in some graduate classes—both online and on campus. Our summer experience on campus can’t be beat. With each class lasting one week and with teachers coming from all over the country, it’s a bit like a summer camp for social studies teachers! Fans of game-based learning or historical simulations will have two options during the first week of on-campus classes, as Progressive Era and Indian Assimilation, Resi

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Professors Try ‘Restrained AI’ Approach to Help Teach Writing

ED Surge

When ChatGPT emerged a year and half ago, many professors immediately worried that their students would use it as a substitute for doing their own written assignments — that they’d click a button on a chatbot instead of doing the thinking involved in responding to an essay prompt themselves. But two English professors at Carnegie Mellon University had a different first reaction: They saw in this new technology a way to show students how to improve their writing skills.

Teaching 123
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Charting Your Course: Micro-credentials Can Support Personal and Professional Development

Digital Promise

Micro-credentials can expand your personal and professional development, be combined to create a custom learning path, and can even kickstart a lifelong learning experience.

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NEH Grantees: April 2024

Society for Classical Studies

NEH Grantees: April 2024 kskordal Mon, 05/06/2024 - 09:22 Image Congratulations to the following individuals and organizations announced as National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Grantees in April 2024, for their projects in classical studies and adjacent fields: David Danzig, Paige Brevick (Save Ancient Studies Inc): Increasing Humanities Engagement through Archaeogaming Christy Schirmer: A Socioeconomic History of River Exploitation in the Roman Empire Joel Mann (St.

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PROOF POINTS: 5 takeaways about segregation 70 years after the Brown decision

The Hechinger Report

It was one of the most significant days in the history of the U.S. Supreme Court. On May 17, 1954, the nine justices unanimously ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that schools segregated by race did not provide an equal education. Students could no longer be barred from a school because of the color of their skin. To commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Brown decision, I wanted to look at how far we’ve come in integrating our schools and how far we still have to go.

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People’s History of Memorial Day

Zinn Education Project

For Memorial Day, we feature an article by David Blight about the early origins of the holiday, led by African Americans in Charleston, South Carolina, after the Civil War; an article by Howard Zinn urging us to never embark on mass slaughter again; and the documentary and companion oral history collection, Memorial Day Massacre: Workers Die, Film Buried.

History 111
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A Remarkable Discovery of a 450,000-Year-Old Tooth in Iran

Anthropology.net

Introduction: A Landmark Discovery in Qaleh Kurd Cave In a momentous archaeological breakthrough, French and Iranian researchers have unearthed compelling evidence of early human habitation in Iran's Central Plateau, pushing back the known timeline of human settlement in the region by an astonishing 300,000 years. This discovery, centered at Qaleh Kurd Cave in Qazvin, not only redefines our understanding of ancient human migrations but also sheds light on the strategic importance of this region

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The Impact of Inclusive STEM Education

ED Surge

STEM identity can last a lifetime and help students thrive in school, future careers and life. Inclusive STEM programs widen job opportunities for the growing technology sector, support students in building digital literacy skills and empower young people to become creators — not just consumers — of technology. Educators face the challenge of engaging students in STEM amidst limited resources.

Education 123
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These 6 Core Tenets Power Inclusive Education R&D at Digital Promise

Digital Promise

Learn more about the six core tenets of Inclusive Innovation R&D that are foundational for school and community-based innovation to emerge.

Education 117
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Unlocking Teacher Potential: 5 Secrets to Effective Professional Growth

Edthena

Instructional coaching has been a key component powering the professional growth of teachers for many years. However, the challenge has always been a numbers game, how can districts provide enough coaching when instructional coaching resources are limited? The Coordinator of Professional Learning and Leadership for Keller ISD , Valerie Minor, shared her secrets for tackling this challenge at the Learning Forward Texas conference.

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PROOF POINTS: We have tried paying teachers based on how much students learn. Now schools are expanding that idea to contractors and vendors.

The Hechinger Report

Schools spend billions of dollars a year on products and services, including everything from staplers and textbooks to teacher coaching and training. Does any of it help students learn more? Some educational materials end up mothballed in closets. Much software goes unused. Yet central-office bureaucrats frequently renew their contracts with outside vendors regardless of usage or efficacy.

Tutoring 115