March, 2024

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11 Ideas for Primary Math Stations

A Principal's Reflections

A few weeks back, I shared ideas on ELA stations for primary students after this was brought up during a coaching cycle with one of my schools. Upon reflection, I decided to do the same with math. Creating math stations for primary students can be a fun and effective way to introduce them to basic math concepts through hands-on activities. These stations can help develop their understanding of numbers, shapes, patterns, and measurements in an interactive and engaging manner.

Teaching 420
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3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st-Century Student

TeachThought

3 Knowledge Domains For Teaching And Learning by TeachThought Staff Thinking in the 21st century is just different. That doesn’t […] The post 3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st-Century Student appeared first on TeachThought.

Teaching 329
educators

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How Academic Historians can be Useful to K-12 Teachers

NCHE

After Jessica Ellison invited me to participate in a conversation about how academic historians might be of use to K-12 teachers, I did a little research: I asked teachers at our state social studies council what they most needed for their work. The answers were clear: time and confidence, they said. The two needs are related, for there is simply not enough time for those who teach multiple classes, often in multiple disciplines, to stay on top of the flood of specialized writing, to be conf

K-12 312
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Bringing Anthropological Concepts to Life in a Virtual Peer Exchange

Teaching Anthropology

By Shelene Gomes, University of the West Indies, & Lara Watkins, Bridgewater State University Students can read about culture, but hearing peers narrate personal experiences in another country provides invaluable firsthand insights. Analysing these narratives allows for a deeper understanding of cultural differences. In this instance, the online platform Flip enabled cross-institutional, cross-border student interactions to discuss cultural similarities and differences— core subject matter o

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Social Studies Thick Slides

HistoryRewriter

Thick Slides (although not in our book) are a flexible and popular EduProtocol that should be in every Social Studies teacher’s toolbox. Thick Slides help students extract key information from text, lesson, or video and complete a deconstructed paragraph that asks for specific fields like who, where, what, when, and why? They are a fun and engaging formative or summative assessment that gives students some structure for writing.

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3 Reasons Teachers Should Use the Playlist Model

Catlin Tucker

Let’s start with a quick review of the playlist, or individual rotation, model for those who have not heard of it. A playlist is a sequence of learning activities designed to move students toward a desired result. Most playlists culminate in a performance task or artifact intended to demonstrate students’ ability to transfer or apply what they learned working through the playlist.

Artifacts 186
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Cultivating Lifelong Learners: How to Support Personalized Teacher Growth

A Principal's Reflections

Imagine a classroom buzzing with engaged students, actively constructing knowledge and diving deep into topics that spark their curiosity. This vibrant learning environment does not just happen by chance. It thrives under the guidance of a passionate, skilled educator who is constantly evolving alongside their students. However, like their students, teachers need personalized growth opportunities to stay engaged, motivated, and effective.

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Teaching the Judicial Branch

Passion for Social Studies

While the United States runs smoothly now, this has not always happened. It took trials and tribulations to form different departments, appoint leaders, and establish law. Thankfully, the branches of government all have essential yet distinct roles. This allows them to focus on specific aspects to strengthen and successfully run the United States without conflict.

Teaching 130
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Pacific Podcasts

Geography Education

I love the podcast “Everything Everywhere Daily” Podcast. As the title implies it’s an omnivorous exploration of fascinating topics, often focusing on interesting places or pivotal moments in history. Most are approximately 10-minute summaries. Some island nations of the Pacific are very remote, and consequently, more distinct and less well-known to the outsiders.

History 130
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PROOF POINTS: Learning science might help kids read better

The Hechinger Report

A growing chorus of education researchers, pundits and “science of reading” advocates are calling for young children to be taught more about the world around them. It’s an indirect way of teaching reading comprehension. The theory is that what we grasp from what we read depends on whether we can hook it to concepts and topics that we already know. Natalie Wexler’s 2019 best-selling book, The Knowledge Gap , championed knowledge-building curricula and more schools around the country, from Baltimo

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Vocabulary Haiku: A Creative Approach to Deeping Understanding of Academic Vocabulary

Catlin Tucker

Written by Noelle Gutierrez Educators know the importance of academic vocabulary instruction. Student knowledge of academic words and phrases has a direct impact on their ability to acquire and comprehend information, which is why it should be a part of every subject area and class. As an instructional coach and administrator, I regularly observed teachers providing direct instruction using explicit vocabulary routines.

Education 142
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Relevant Thinking and Learner Success

A Principal's Reflections

In today's rapidly changing world, where new challenges and technologies emerge at an unprecedented pace, students need to be relevant thinkers to successfully navigate the complex social, economic, and environmental issues they will face. The ability to think relevantly enables them to connect classroom learning with real-world applications, fostering deeper learning and cultivating critical life competencies such as problem-solving, adaptability, and creativity.

Pedagogy 389
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An Example Of Rigor-Based Differentiation

TeachThought

contributed by Barbara R. Blackburn Differentiation is a popular concept in today’s schools. After all, it makes sense. We’d all love to provide instruction tailored to every student’s needs. However, intentionally or accidentally, many teachers simply lower the rigor for struggling students. When we do that regularly, students always stay behind.

Advocacy 293
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What Brings Gen Z to the Library?

ED Surge

Gen Zers, born between 1997 and 2012, spend a lot of time online, consuming and creating digital content. Ninety-two percent check social media daily. But they still like print, and they still like to go to the library, according to a survey of Gen Z and Millennial public library use and media consumption released by the American Library Association last fall.

Library 141
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Using lidar data to see the past

Geography Education

A lidar image reveals ancient Mayan structures Archaeologists have spent more than a century traipsing through the Guatemalan jungle, Indiana Jones-style, searching through dense vegetation to learn what they could about the Maya civilization. Scientists using high-tech, airplane-based lidar mapping tools have discovered tens of thousands of structures constructed by the Maya: defense works, houses, buildings, industrial-size agricultural fields, even new pyramids.

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Was the “Odyssey” originally set in the Baltic?

Strange Maps

Had he not wrapped himself in a discarded cloak, Ulysses would have frozen to death at Troy. Our hero’s host, Eumaeus the swineherd, hears the story and gets the hint: He loans Ulysses a cloak, because again, the night is freezing cold. This part of Homer’s Odyssey doesn’t sound very Mediterranean. Sprinkled through Homer’s twin epics, Felice Vinci spotted a heap of similar anecdotes that pointed away from the traditional setting of the Iliad , an account of the Trojan War, and the Odyssey

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Pre-assessment is Key to Designing with Intention

Catlin Tucker

At a recent workshop, a teacher posed a compelling question about the effectiveness of small-group versus whole-group instruction. This inquiry always prompts me to reflect: How many educators gather pre-assessment data before crafting their lesson plans? Such preliminary insights, whether through pre-assessments, diagnostics, or activities aimed at accessing prior knowledge, can illuminate the diverse range of skills, abilities, and needs within a classroom.

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AI in the Classroom: A Teacher's Toolkit for Transformation

A Principal's Reflections

The landscape of education is constantly evolving, and artificial intelligence (AI) is emerging as a powerful tool for educators. While it won't replace the irreplaceable human touch in the classroom, AI can significantly enhance teaching and learning by offering personalization, efficiency, and insightful data analysis. Below are some ways educators can leverage AI to create a more dynamic and effective learning environment while also getting professional learning support from Five Star Technol

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Richard Feynman On Knowing Versus Understanding

TeachThought

Richard Feynman On Knowing Versus Understanding by TeachThought Staff Who is Richard Feynman? Richard Feynman, born in 1918, was a theoretical physicist whose work in quantum mechanics earned him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965. According to nobelprize.org , Feynman obtained his B.Sc. in 1939 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and studied “at Princeton University, where he obtained his Ph.D. in 1942. “He was Research Assistant at Princeton (1940-1941), Professor of Theor

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Data science under fire: What math do high schoolers really need?

The Hechinger Report

OXNARD, Calif. — On a Wednesday morning this December, Dale Perizzolo’s math class at Adolfo Camarillo High School is anything but quiet. Students chat about the data analysis they’ve performed on their cellphone usage over a week, while Perizzolo walks around the room fielding their questions. The students came up with the project themselves and designed a Google form to track their phone time, including which apps they used most.

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For the Love of Cats in Turkey

Sapiens

On a visit to feline-friendly Turkey, an anthropologist considers what long-standing practices of caring for cats reveal about human societies. ✽ While visiting eastern Turkey to climb Mount Ararat, I discovered a nice cafe called Ru Sahaf in the town of Doğubayazıt. I had arrived days before the hike and was looking for a place to work remotely. The cafe had nice chairs, jazz music, good coffee, and decent internet: a perfect spot.

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8 New Districts Join the League of Innovative Schools

Digital Promise

From Pennsylvania to California, these eight districts are the latest to join the network of 150 forward-thinking education leaders.

Education 147
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We Need More Math Teachers. Here’s How to Prepare Them for Life in the Classroom.

ED Surge

During the day, I teach Algebra I classes to high school freshmen in Springfield, Missouri. One night per week, I teach preservice elementary school teachers who serve as paraprofessionals at K-12 schools in Louisiana, Arkansas, Alabama and California through Reach University. Reach University offers adults employed in schools and other workplaces the opportunity to earn a unique bachelor’s degree that embraces work experience as part of the learning process.

K-12 127
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Reading Collaborative Life Writing in the Memoirs of Princess Daschkaw (1840) – Alexis Wolf

Women's History Network

In 1840, Memoirs of Princess Daschkaw, Lady of Honour to Catherine II was published in England. The two-volume text included the personal memoirs of Russian noblewoman Ekaterina Dashkova (1743-1810), one of the most powerful, well-known and misunderstood women figures of the Enlightenment.

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Tips For Improving Family Engagement Through School-Home Communication

TeachThought

Tips for improving family engagement through home-school communication include goal setting and consistent communication. The post Tips For Improving Family Engagement Through School-Home Communication appeared first on TeachThought.

Education 209
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PROOF POINTS: The surprising effectiveness of having kids study why they failed

The Hechinger Report

In an experiment on how best to study for a math test, learning through errors was pitted against working through practice problems in a Barron’s study guide, pictured above. Credit: Jill Barshay/ The Hechinger Report / The Hechinger Report For a few weeks in the spring of 2016, nearly all the eighth graders at a small public school affiliated with Columbia University agreed to stay late after school to study math.

Tradition 138
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Excavating the Coexistence of Neanderthals and Modern Humans

Sapiens

An archaeologist explains how remains recently recovered from a cave in present-day Germany suggest that Neanderthals and modern humans populated Europe together for at least 10,000 years. This article was originally published at The Conversation and has been republished under Creative Commons. ✽ THE IDEA THAT TWO different human species, Homo sapiens (us) and Neanderthals, coexisted in Western Eurasia 50,000–40,000 years ago has long captured the imagination of academics and the public alike.

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How Can Educational Leaders Strengthen Digital Equity in an Age of AI?

Digital Promise

The post How Can Educational Leaders Strengthen Digital Equity in an Age of AI? appeared first on Digital Promise.

Education 140
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Can AI Aid the Early Education Workforce?

ED Surge

Since ChatGPT was released in November 2022 and exploded into public discourse, the emergence of generative AI tools has been met with both excitement and concern, across virtually every industry, ideology and age group. Today, the use of this technology in education settings is underway, and states are even beginning to release guidance on how to navigate AI in schools.

K-12 127
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On the Podcast: The Dispatch with Katie Kelly and Lester Laminack

Heinemann Blog

Welcome to The Dispatch, a Heinemann podcast series. Over the next several weeks, we'll hear from Heinemann thought leaders as they discuss the most pressing issues in education today. In this episode, we hear from co-authors and longtime friends, Katie Kelly and Lester Laminack about the importance of treating teachers like the professionals they are and celebrating the incredible work they do.

Education 105
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A Powerful, One-Sentence Argument For Progressive Learning

TeachThought

by TeachThought Staff Do not limit a child to your own learning, for they were born for another time. R […] The post A Powerful, One-Sentence Argument For Progressive Learning appeared first on TeachThought.

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PROOF POINTS: How Covid narrowed the STEM pipeline

The Hechinger Report

The STEM pipeline – a metaphor for the development of future scientists, engineers and other high tech workers – likely starts with a narrower funnel in the post-pandemic era. Credit: CSA Images via Getty Images Universities, philanthropies, and even the U.S. government are all trying to encourage more young Americans to pursue careers in STEM, an acronym for science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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The Week That Was In 505

Moler's Musing

I’m currently writing this from the O’Hare Airport in Chicago as I make my way to Madison, Wisconsin for the WCSS Conference. I’m looking forward to this conference as I will meet up with my friend, and co-author, Dr. Scott Petri. We are doing multiple sessions on EduProtocols and I’m doing an extra session on utilizing AI within the classroom.

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Retaining Teachers Requires a Belonging Strategy

Education Elements

Post-pandemic data shows that teachers are leaving the profession in higher numbers than they were before the pandemic and for reasons other than retirement or inadequate performance. These high turnover rates have many impacts on the school community , not the least of which is a detrimental effect on student growth and achievement. Why are teachers quitting, and what can be done to stop this troubling trend?

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Many Students Don’t Inform Their Colleges About Their Disability. That Needs to Change.

ED Surge

In summer 2012, my life changed. I was a 20-year-old college student with a bright future. I was fearless and ready to take the world by storm. All of my hopes and dreams came crashing down when I began experiencing what felt like a black curtain within my field of vision in my right eye. I went to my eye doctor and learned I was suffering from a retinal detachment that required surgery.

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A 3000+ Document Library: A Blessing or a Curse?

Teaching American History

As Publications Manager at Teaching American History , I frequently hear the following from our teacher partners: I love teaching with primary sources! But which one should I use? Your website is great! But I feel overwhelmed when I look all the documents. My district has dropped our textbook and we are switching to primary sources. Where do I even start?

Library 105
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Busting the Myths: Debunking 6 Common Instructional Coaching Misconceptions

Edthena

With more than 10 years of experience supporting educators and organizations, our team has encountered several myths regarding instructional coaching. Here are a few common misconceptions and why it’s important to dispel them. Myth 1: Instructional coaching is only for struggling teachers Instructional coaching (and coaching in general) is not something that is only for people who are struggling.

Tradition 105