February, 2024

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What School Should Be

A Principal's Reflections

I vividly remember the first World Book Encyclopedia set my parents bought for the house in the early 1980’s. It was a sight to behold as what seemed like an infinite amount of knowledge was alphabetically organized, just waiting to be consumed. Housed in the dining room for ease of access by all, the copper and cream books with gold trim were a staple resource for my brothers and me when we had to do any research for school work.

Tradition 410
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How a Portrait Project Showed Teachers Through a Whole New Lens

Cult of Pedagogy

Listen to the interview with Dan Tricarico: Sponsored by WeVideo and The Modern Classrooms Project This page contains Amazon Affiliate and Bookshop.org links. When you make a purchase through these links, Cult of Pedagogy gets a small percentage of the sale at no extra cost to you. What’s the difference between Amazon and Bookshop.org? I have always loved photography.

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What Is Cognitive Constructivism?

TeachThought

Learning theory isn’t generally high on the list of practicing teachers. For starters, teachers are busy poring over the classic–or […] The post What Is Cognitive Constructivism? appeared first on TeachThought.

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Writing workshop with US author, Joan Leegent

Pedagogy to Share

Last night, I had the pleasure of hosting a prize-winning American author, Joan Leegent , at my end-of-semester meeting for faculty. We are grateful to the US Embassy in Tel Aviv for bringing Joan to the country and funding her work with our lecturers and students. What an exciting way to conclude one of our most challenging semesters. We met on Zoom to be inspired by Joan and to process our thoughts, emotions and memories in writing.

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MLK vs Malcolm X

Passion for Social Studies

When teaching US History, there is a strong focus on heroic individuals. Honestly, the strength of some of our heroes allowed the United States to grow and develop in powerful ways. For instance, MLK and Malcolm X used their voices to fight for equality. However, they did their work differently. While MLK was more calm and collected, Malcolm X was more abrasive in his work.

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Hero’s Journey Simplified

HistoryRewriter

Adam Moler and I had a ball presenting together during the Catalina Lesson Design Mixer last week. Adam truly excels at simplifying pedagogy and combines it with an instinctive gift for self-reflection at a depth that I am incapable of. Working with him has helped me grow as a teacher in soooo many ways. Our friendship provides a clear example of how EduProtocols gives teachers a common language to discuss instructional practices and helps us focus on identifying instructional misconceptions tog

Pedagogy 234
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Unlocking the Spectrum of Learning: The Multi-Faceted Magic of Personalization

A Principal's Reflections

We live in exciting times as unprecedented access to knowledge, research, and effective strategies at our fingertips can assist educators in creating meaningful experiences for students that align with both needs and strengths. One thing is for certain: learning is not linear. While a one-size-fits-all approach either worked for us or we just managed to get by, our connected world has shined a light on shifts that can be made to maximize students' time in class.

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The Benefits Of Using LEGOs To Promote Literacy

TeachThought

From promoting vocabulary to fostering creative storytelling, LEGOs offer a surprisingly useful tool for literacy education The post The Benefits Of Using LEGOs To Promote Literacy appeared first on TeachThought.

Education 251
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PROOF POINTS: Controversies within the science of reading

The Hechinger Report

Four meta-analyses conclude that it’s more effective to teach phonemic awareness with letters, not as an oral-only exercise. Credit: Allison Shelley for EDU Educators around the country have embraced the “science of reading” in their classrooms, but that doesn’t mean there’s a truce in the reading wars. In fact, controversies are emerging about an important but less understood aspect of learning to read: phonemic awareness.

Tutoring 145
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What’s Behind the Evolution of Neanderthal Portraits

Sapiens

Since the 1800s, Neanderthal depictions have evolved not only with changing science but also due to social views. An archaeologist explains why visualizations of our evolutionary cousins matter. NEANDERTHALS’ FIRST PORTRAITS In 1888, a few decades after the first scientifically named Homo neanderthalensis fossil surfaced, anthropologist and anatomist Hermann Schaaffhausen made a portrait of what that Neanderthal might have looked like in life.

Museum 145
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‘Ane good receipt for the mother in trouball’: The anatomy of a seventeenth-century Scottish medical book – Roslyn Potter

Women's History Network

The year is 1649 and Lady Jean Wemyss has a headache. Since paracetamol won’t be invented for another several hundred years, Jean reaches for the next best thing: a handwritten recipe book. The cure, written down in her mother’s neat hand, suggests the use of some trusted betony water.

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10 Ideas for Primary ELA Stations

A Principal's Reflections

In my coaching work, suggestions typically arise for ideas on implementing various personalized strategies effectively at the primary level (PreK – 1). While choice , in my opinion, might not be the most developmentally appropriate option, I do see station rotation (or centers) as a viable option. Establishing engaging and educational station activities for primary-age students in the English Language Arts (ELA) curriculum is essential for fostering literacy skills, including reading, writing, l

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Online Teaching Is Improving In-Person Instruction on Campus

ED Surge

Since the earliest days of colleges experimenting with teaching over the internet, the goal has been to replicate as closely as possible the physical classroom experience. After all, in-person was seen as the gold standard, and the question was whether that could be faithfully reproduced online. But since the COVID-19 pandemic forced instructors around the world to try online education, something unexpected has happened: Professors have found that there are some online teaching methods that work

Teaching 130
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On The Danger Of Popular Ideas In Education

TeachThought

New ideas, often in the shape of 'fads,' are, at best, distractions. It just might be that education already has more than enough new ideas. The post On The Danger Of Popular Ideas In Education appeared first on TeachThought.

Education 241
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Remembering our friend and colleague Fazil Khan

The Hechinger Report

Fazil Khan got in just under the wire when he applied for a data reporter job at The Hechinger Report in the summer of 2022. While his application may have been among the last received, his interview vaulted him to the front of the pack. “I don’t know that anyone has ever made that positive a first impression on me anywhere, let alone via a tiny Zoom screen,” said Sarah Butrymowicz, Hechinger’s senior editor for investigations and Khan’s direct supervisor.

Cultures 144
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Under the Baghdad Sun

Anthropology News

Credit: Murtaja Lateef Souk al-Shorja, Baghdad’s oldest market, summer 2023. During a brief visit to Iraq in the heat of summer 2023, Volker Türk, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, declared , “The era of global boiling has indeed begun.” It was an assertion that no Baghdadi would dispute. In the Iraqi capital, summers extend over seven months , characterized by a hot, arid climate with intense sunlight and temperatures that can exceed 50°C (122°F).

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Replacing Plastic Prayers With Biodegradable Blessings in the Himalayas

Sapiens

As synthetic prayer flags and scarves pollute the Himalayan region, a team of scholars and activists work to spread sustainable materials drawn from Indigenous knowledge. ✽ In the summer of 2022, one of us, Kalzang Dorjee Bhutia, brought gifts to his relatives with babies in northeast India. In their Sikkimese Bhutia community, new mothers receive chicken, cash, and other items known as Bya-kay—literally, “bringing a chicken.

Tradition 121
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Revealing an AI Literacy Framework for Learners and Educators

Digital Promise

The post Revealing an AI Literacy Framework for Learners and Educators appeared first on Digital Promise.

Education 150
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Computer Science Course Offerings in High School Spur More Students to Coding Degrees

ED Surge

In recent years high schools across the country have been adding computer science courses, and there is a movement to make them ubiquitous. A new study of an unusually rich dataset in Maryland found that such efforts can have a significant impact when it comes to getting more students to go on to careers in coding, and in bringing more diversity to the field.

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Simple Ways To Use Artificial Intelligence In The Classroom

TeachThought

Google can't replace critical thinking. Artificial intelligence is similar: it can be useful or can also make users overly dependent on it. The post Simple Ways To Use Artificial Intelligence In The Classroom appeared first on TeachThought.

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PARENT VOICE: They call it ‘school choice,’ but you may not end up with much of a choice at all

The Hechinger Report

If you live in Arizona, school choice may be coming to your neighborhood soon. As someone who has had more school choice than I know what to do with, I can tell you what may feel like a shocking surprise: Private schools have the power to choose, not parents. I live inPhoenix, where the nearby town of Paradise Valley is getting ready to offer the privatization movement’s brand of choice to families.

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NEH Grantees: January 2024

Society for Classical Studies

NEH Grantees: January 2024 kskordal Mon, 02/05/2024 - 09:06 Image The Society for Classical Studies congratulates the following individuals and organizations announced as National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Grantees in January 2024, for their projects in classical studies and adjacent fields: Mark Algee-Hewitt, Eric Harvey (Leland Stanford Junior University): Digital Accessibility for Blind Scholars of Antiquity Aaron Hershkowitz, Nicholas Howe (Institute for Advanced Study): Developing

Heritage 119
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Defend the Freedom to Learn in Georgia: Back-to-School Read-Aloud

Zinn Education Project

February 2024 Update: The school district’s firing of Katie Rinderle was just upheld by the state board. To support Katie and the freedom to learn, we will continue this offer to send a copy of My Shadow Is Purple and related titles to Georgia teachers who agree to read the book in their classroom. In the face of Georgia’s HB 1084 Protect Students First Act, often referred to as the “divisive concepts” act, many teachers are being told to avoid teaching about race, gender, class, cli

Museum 111
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Heatcraft: Handmade Story of an Iceshelf in the Persian Gulf

Anthropology News

By Yāmāl Collective (Elaheh Habibi, Ahmad Moradi, and Zohreh Moradi) Standing in the shade at the waterfront historical pearl market of Laft, we were struggling to look at the sea, squinting against the glaring sun. Laft, an ancient coastal village in Iran’s south renowned for its windcatchers ( bādgir ), was once a bustling and vital port connecting the Persian Gulf to far-flung corners of the world.

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How a Holden Caulfield Chatbot Helped My Students Develop AI Literacy

ED Surge

“I think I’m talking to Salinger. Can I ask?” My student stood next to my desk, computer resting on both hands, his eyes wide with a mixture of fear and excitement. We were wrapping up our end-of-book project for “The Catcher in the Rye,” which involved students interviewing a character chatbot designed to mimic the personality and speaking style of Holden Caulfield.

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Getting Started Using Talking Circles In The Classroom

TeachThought

Circle practice in the classroom involves sitting in a circle and engaging in age-approriate meaningful dialogue. The post Getting Started Using Talking Circles In The Classroom appeared first on TeachThought.

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STUDENT VOICE: Teachers assign us work that relies on rote memorization, then tell us not to use artificial intelligence

The Hechinger Report

At the beginning of the school year, each of my 11th grade teachers stated that they would not tolerate students using AI platforms, such as ChatGPT, to complete assignments. They explained that any use of AI would be considered plagiarism and could result in a failing grade. Despite these warnings, I regularly hear my classmates laugh about how they used ChatGPT for the prior night’s homework.

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On the Podcast: Growing Language & Literacy

Heinemann Blog

Today, we'll hear author Andrea Honigsfeld in conversation with Pam Schwallier, the director of EL and Bilingual Programs at West Ottawa Public Schools in Michigan. Andrea is the author of Growing Language and Literacy: Strategies for English Learners. The deep respect they have for their profession and for the population of students who bring rich linguistic heritages to the classroom is powerful.

Heritage 111
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How AI for Education Can Address Digital Equity

Digital Promise

The post How AI for Education Can Address Digital Equity appeared first on Digital Promise.

Education 146
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Finding Footprints Laid at the Dawn of Time

Sapiens

In the Brazilian Amazon, a university-trained archaeologist and Wajãpi Indigenous people understand traces from the past differently—but their partnership bears fruit for both. FOOTPRINTS FROM INFANT EARTH Sitting on a log, in the ever-present shadow of the Amazon forest, Roseno Wajãpi and I shared pieces of cassava bread and chunks of smoked fish. He told me about the beginning of time.

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What Educators Need to Know about Generation Alpha

ED Surge

On a recent walk after spending a day working with middle school teachers on engagement strategies, I was listening to the “We Can Do Hard Things” podcast. The guest, Allison Russell, was talking about the emotional intelligence of young people and mentioned that she’d just learned that her daughter was part of Generation Alpha , which refers to people born after 2010.

Education 127
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7 Reasons Why Online Learning Is The Future Of Education

TeachThought

With demand for continuous skill development, online education is well-positioned as a key player in the future of educational delivery. The post 7 Reasons Why Online Learning Is The Future Of Education appeared first on TeachThought.

Education 177
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PROOF POINTS: Overscheduling kids’ lives causes depression and anxiety, study finds

The Hechinger Report

Psychologists have long warned that children’s lives are overscheduled, which undermines their ability to develop non-academic skills that they’ll need in adulthood, from coping with setbacks to building strong relationships. Now a trio of economists say they’ve been able to calculate some of these psychological costs. In a new data analysis published in the February 2024 issue of the Economics of Education Review , three economists from the University of Georgia and the Federal Reserve Board fo

Tutoring 139
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Rethinking Cultural Evolution: Insights into Stone Tool Technology

Anthropology.net

A groundbreaking study 1 led by researchers at the Nagoya University Museum in Japan offers fresh insights into the cultural evolution of Homo sapiens during their dispersal across Eurasia roughly 50,000 to 40,000 years ago. These findings challenge conventional beliefs about the timing and nature of cultural transitions during this pivotal period in human history.

Cultures 105
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Birth Is Hot and Sweaty, and So Am I:  Accessing Patient Care through Shared Discomfort

Anthropology News

Throughout my career as a registered midwife, I’ve delivered hundreds of babies in hundreds of birthing rooms: hospital rooms; living rooms; kitchens; bedrooms; bathrooms a few times; a front hallway, twice; a staircase, once; a parking lot, almost once; an elevator. Birthing rooms, no matter the location, are places of labor—and where there is labor, there is heat.

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Improving Undergrad Chemistry with Evidence-based Teaching and Digital Courseware

Digital Promise

The post Improving Undergrad Chemistry with Evidence-based Teaching and Digital Courseware appeared first on Digital Promise.

Teaching 120
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How a Culture of Caring Is Helping These Schools Improve Student Mental Health

ED Surge

A few years on from district-wide remote learning spurred by the coronavirus pandemic, Principal Darren A. Cole-Ochoa has observed the students at Truan Junior High re-adapting to in-person schooling fall along a spectrum. “When we got into the classroom, the students were shy. They didn't want to work in groups. They had a wall,” Cole-Ochoa says of the students in the small town of Elsa, Texas.

Cultures 126