Wed.May 22, 2024

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Early Educators Deserve Better, Starting With Health Care and Retirement Benefits

ED Surge

About two years ago, I had a health crisis that not only jeopardized my well-being, but also threatened the continuity of care for the families I serve as the owner of a home-based child care program. One day when I was cleaning up at the end of a work day, I began experiencing heart palpitations and difficulty breathing. After a number of medical visits, I was hospitalized and eventually diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AFIB) — a condition which can lead to blood clots and a risk of stroke o

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Four cities of FAFSA chaos: Students tell how they grappled with the mess, stress

The Hechinger Report

By Liz Willen For many high school seniors and others hoping to attend college next year, the last few months have become a stress-filled struggle to complete the trouble-plagued, much-maligned FAFSA, or Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The rollout of this updated and supposedly simplified form was so delayed, error-ridden and confusing that it has derailed or severely complicated college decisions for millions of students throughout the U.S., especially those from low-income, first-gen

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Ancient Viruses in the Human Genome Linked to Mental Health Conditions

Anthropology.net

Ancient viruses that integrated into the human genome millions of years ago may influence the risk of mental health conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. These viruses, remnants of retroviruses known as human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), can exhibit abnormal activity levels in individuals genetically predisposed to these disorders, according to a recent study.

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Smithsonian Hosts an Education Conference Unlike Any Other This Summer

Smithsonian Voices | Smithsonian Education

The 4th annual National Education Summit is a one-of-a-kind, signature three-day program hosted by the Smithsonian, featuring inspiring keynotes, deep-dive sessions, hands-on workshops and an evening networking reception

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Choosing Wisely: Lessons for Leaders in AI Integration

ED Surge

When it comes to AI in education, one edtech company stands out as a sage leader and trailblazing pioneer. Amid the chaotic deluge of new generative AI tools, claims and calamities inundating school leaders, Carnegie Learning has been all in on AI for nearly 25 years. After starting with MATHia , an adaptive AI tutor that personalizes instruction for middle and high school students, Carnegie Learning branched out last year into AI-based tools for literacy, languages, tutoring and even profession

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Ancient Chesapeake Site Challenges Timeline of Humans in the Americas

Anthropology.net

Unearthing History in the Chesapeake Bay With the Chesapeake Bay lapping at his knee-high boots, Darrin Lowery surveyed a 10-foot-tall bluff rising above a narrow strip of beach. To the untrained eye, this wall of sandy sediment is an unremarkable edge of a modest island southeast of the Bay Bridge. However, for Lowery, a coastal geologist, its crumbling layers place the island at the center of one of archaeology's most contentious battles: when and how humans first arrived in the Americas.

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PTI Primary Hub Meeting - 5th of June

Living Geography

One of my next events to speak at is this PTI Primary Hub meeting. The session is all about maps and mapping, and I will be doing a keynote and then assisting with a range of workshops. Booking still open I believe.

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Revenge tourism

Living Geography

This has been a trend since the pandemic lockdowns which prevented people getting away. It is also called revenge travel. Revenge tourism is a phrase you may not have heard, but which I hadn't really considered before. It was clear that people would make up for 'lost time' and taking trips they might not otherwise have done. This is now becoming more widespread.

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Last Chance to Record Archaic Greek Language ‘Heading for Extinction’

Anthropology.net

The Romeyka language, an ancient Greek dialect on the verge of disappearing, is the focus of a new initiative led by Professor Ioanna Sitaridou of Queens' College and the Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages and Linguistics. This project aligns with the UN's International Decade of Indigenous Languages (2022-32), which seeks to bring attention to the plight of endangered languages and rally resources for their preservation and revitalization.

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Humans Who. Series Debut

Heinemann Blog

Shamari Reid kicks off the Humans Who… series with a live interview with NYT bestselling author Bettina L. Love! Tune into YouTube on May 30 at 7pm EST.

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Meet DFP Spring Fellow, Angela Danso Gyane, University of Missouri, Columbia

Political Science Now

Angela Danso Gyane is a political science Ph.D. student at the University of Missouri-Columbia’s Truman School of Government and Public Affairs. She holds a history and political science BA from the College of Wooster. Her primary fields of study are international relations and comparative politics, with a particular focus on the intricate dynamics of race, ethnicity, and gender in international relations.

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Constitution-Making in the 21st Century: Lessons from the Chilean Process

Political Science Now

Constitution-Making in the 21st Century: Lessons from the Chilean Process By Claudia Heiss , University of Chile , and Julieta Suárez-Cao , Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, A distinctive feature of 21st-century constitution making is the role assigned to citizens through various forms of direct participation, as well as special efforts to include groups underrepresented and marginalized in ordinary politics.

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The Motherhood Advantage and Feminist Immorality

Political Science Now

In the APSA Public Scholarship Program, graduate students in political science produce summaries of new research in the American Political Science Review. This piece, written by Komal Preet Kaur , covers the new article by Martin Naunov, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, “The Effect of Protesters’ Gender on Public Reactions to Protests and Protest Repression.” Protests serve as a significant form of political participation in both democratic and non-democratic countries, a