Sat.May 11, 2024 - Fri.May 17, 2024

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The Never-ending Upgrade: Why Constant Growth is the Key to Success

A Principal's Reflections

While I enjoy keynoting and facilitating workshops, it is through a coaching lens that I get to see how teachers and administrators are implementing innovative learning strategies with fidelity. Through their actions, I can collect evidence to show efficacy while curating exemplars I can share in my presentations. No matter where I go, I get the same message from educators on their desire for practical strategies.

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Strategies To Help Students Retain What You Taught Them

TeachThought

15 Reflection Strategies To Help Students Retain What You Just Taught Them by Terry Heick Reflection is a natural part of learning. We all think about new experiences–the camping on the car ride home, the mistakes made in a game, or the emotions felt while finishing a long-term project that’s taken months to complete. Below I’ve shared 15 strategies for students to reflect on their learning.

educators

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Political Socialization

Passion for Social Studies

America is unique for many reasons. People can choose what they believe in, from cultures to religions. Additionally, people learn to compromise and work with others with different beliefs. All of this is part of political socialization. Essentially, this is the process where people develop their political knowledge, values, and ideology. This often begins in childhood and continues throughout one’s life.

Sociology 130
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The story of how one college abruptly closed — and kept everyone in the dark

The Hechinger Report

The students were the last to know. On April 29 – just a week before finals – Wells College announced that it would close. The last-minute decision by the 156-year-old liberal arts college in upstate New York sent students rushing to find new colleges for the fall. And it threw newly accepted students, who had already put down deposits, into a frantic scramble to see if the colleges they had turned down would take them back.

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What Would It Take to Attract Gen Z to Teaching?

ED Surge

With interest in the teaching profession waning and enrollment in teacher preparation programs reaching historic lows, all eyes are on the next crop of students — tomorrow’s prospective educators — to make up the deficit. Today’s high school and college students are part of Generation Z, a group of people who range in age from 12 to 28, and have characteristics, attitudes and aspirations that distinguish them from prior generations.

Teaching 133
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Charting Your Course: Micro-credentials Can Support Personal and Professional Development

Digital Promise

Micro-credentials can expand your personal and professional development, be combined to create a custom learning path, and can even kickstart a lifelong learning experience.

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The Week That Was In 505

Moler's Musing

As educators, it is our responsibility to make history come alive for our students. By employing a variety of teaching strategies and resources, we can help them develop a deep understanding and appreciation for the past. In this blog post, I will share my experience teaching the Civil War to my students, highlighting the activities and projects that proved most effective in engaging them and fostering their learning.

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The Impact of Inclusive STEM Education

ED Surge

STEM identity can last a lifetime and help students thrive in school, future careers and life. Inclusive STEM programs widen job opportunities for the growing technology sector, support students in building digital literacy skills and empower young people to become creators — not just consumers — of technology. Educators face the challenge of engaging students in STEM amidst limited resources.

Education 121
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These 6 Core Tenets Power Inclusive Education R&D at Digital Promise

Digital Promise

Learn more about the six core tenets of Inclusive Innovation R&D that are foundational for school and community-based innovation to emerge.

Education 121
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Neanderthal Art: The 130,000-Year-Old Bear Bone Enigma

Anthropology.net

A bone, meticulously carved with 17 parallel incisions, offers a window into the ancient world of the Neanderthals. Discovered in Poland, this artifact challenges our understanding of their cognitive abilities and symbolic culture. Different views of a roughly 4-inches-long (10.6 centimeters) bear bone that has Neanderthal-made cut marks on it. (Image credit: T.

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7 realities for Black students in America, 70 years after Brown

The Hechinger Report

Linda Brown was a third grader in Topeka, Kansas, when her father, Oliver Brown, tried to enroll her in the white public school four blocks from her home. Otherwise, she would have had to walk across railroad tracks to take a bus to attend the nearest all-Black one. When she was denied admission, Oliver Brown sued. The case, and four others from Delaware, the District of Columbia, South Carolina and Virginia were combined and made their way to the Supreme Court.

K-12 102
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Is Student Absenteeism a Growing Problem at Colleges, Too?

ED Surge

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of children regularly miss elementary, middle and high school. Is the same pattern of absenteeism playing out at colleges, too? If so, what’s driving the trend? And what can professors and higher ed leaders do about it? To find out, EdSurge interviewed Terri Hasseler, a professor in the Department of History, Literature, and the Arts at Bryant University in Rhode Island.

Economics 106
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How Verizon Innovative Learning Schools Improved Its Educators’ Job Satisfaction and Career Trajectories

Digital Promise

The post How Verizon Innovative Learning Schools Improved Its Educators’ Job Satisfaction and Career Trajectories appeared first on Digital Promise.

Education 107
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Ancient Viruses: Neanderthal Bones Reveal Secrets of Human Pathogens

Anthropology.net

The study 1 of ancient DNA has led to a groundbreaking discovery: the remnants of three common human viruses within the bones of Neanderthals who roamed the Earth over 50,000 years ago. This finding opens a window into the past, shedding light on the viral landscape of our ancient relatives and raising intriguing questions about the potential recreation of these ancient pathogens.

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Europe remapped: What the energy utopia “Eneropa” would look like in 2050

Strange Maps

Imagine it’s 2050 and the old countries of Europe are gone. In their place are entities based not on history, language, or ethnicity, but on the type of renewable energy they’re best at producing. A centralized power grid redistributes these variously sourced types of energy throughout the continent to even out temporary gaps and seasonal imbalances.

History 100
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Opening Doors: Collaboration Brings Personalized Learning to Life

Education Elements

Implementing personalized learning across an entire school district is an ambitious undertaking. It requires a dedicated investment of time and resources, but the potential benefits for student learning are undeniable. One of the biggest challenges is prioritizing thoughtful professional development for educators amid many competing priorities in districts.

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College Uncovered, Season Two, Episode 7

The Hechinger Report

Students at one New York university have a surprise awaiting them: an $8,000-a-year “academic excellence fee.” We have to ask: Isn’t academic excellence included in tuition? In fact, tuition is only part of the cost of college. Like car dealerships, schools are nickel-and-diming consumers with huge fees — fees for student activities, fees for athletics, fees for building maintenance, fees for libraries, even fees for graduation, the bills for which arrive just as students and their families thou

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Genetic Tapestry of Papua New Guineans: Insights from Denisovan Genes

Anthropology.net

In the lush landscapes of Papua New Guinea, a land steeped in mystery and tradition, lies a genetic tapestry rich with the echoes of ancient human migrations and interbreeding. A recent study 1 sheds light on the unique genetic adaptations of Papua New Guineans, revealing how genes inherited from Denisovans, extinct human relatives, may play a crucial role in their immune response.

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Where Do We Stand Today in the Struggle to Save Public Schools?

Diane Ravitch

A few days ago, I joined a discussion with Dr. Tim Slekar and Dr. Johnny Lupinacci about the current state of public education. It was aired on their show “Busted Pencils,” which is dedicated to teachers, students, and public schools. We talked about charters, vouchers, testing, and how to get involved. Everyone can stand up for what they believe.

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Preamble: Eboo Patel

Institute for Citizens & Scholars

Eboo Patel, president and founder of Interfaith America, joins Raj Vinnakota for a Preamble conversation.

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PROOF POINTS: Tracing Black-white achievement gaps since the Brown decision

The Hechinger Report

Last week, I wrote about trends in school segregation in the 70 years since the Supreme Court’s landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision that declared racial segregation in schools unconstitutional. That data showed considerable progress in integrating schools but also some steps backward, especially since the 1990s in the nation’s biggest cities.

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The Legacy of Yamnaya: Europe's Transformative Ancient Culture

Anthropology.net

Nestled near the tumultuous borders of present-day Ukraine and Russia lies Mykhailivka, a village with archaeological significance dating back millennia. Here, seventy years ago, Ukrainian researchers excavated pivotal insights into the enigmatic Yamnaya culture—a nomadic pastoralist society that emerged approximately 5,000 years ago. Photograph: Emese Gábor/Magyarságkutató Intézet/Hajdúsági Museum/Hajdúböszörmény The Yamnaya's Expansive Re

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Beyond Devices: A Tech Leader's Advice to Building School Community

ED Surge

As you enter today's classrooms, it's clear: Technology isn't just a tool, it's the driving force behind vibrant communities, shaping how students learn and teachers connect. Many students have access to technology in their classrooms, but the true challenge lies in harnessing resources effectively to enhance learning and build stronger, more resilient communities.

K-12 89
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Spaced Repetition

ShortCutsTV

The 7th film in our Dynamic Learning Series designed to introduce students to a range of important ideas and skills related to the science of studying. The series combines both theoretical insights and practical demonstrations of how an understanding of study skills can enhance student exam performance.

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Unsure about a career? Try one, in a job simulation program

The Hechinger Report

Tom Brunskill thought he wanted to be a corporate lawyer. Now, looking back, he thinks it may have had less to do with his actual skills and interests, and more to do with his devoted consumption of television dramas like Suits and Boston Legal. “I used that as my proxy for choosing a career in corporate law, which – shocker – is not a great reason to choose a career,” Brunskill said.

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‘The Farewell was as Painful as a Big Funeral’: Mária Nagy’s Recollections of the Hungarian Medical Assistance to North Korea in the 1950s – Réka Krizmanics

Women's History Network

Not long after the Korean War broke out in early 1950, calls for expressing socialist solidarity with North Korea appeared throughout the Second World.

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This $90M Education Research Project Is Banking on Data Privacy to Drive Insights

ED Surge

With digital education platforms generating data on how millions of students are learning, they are also sitting on veritable information gold mines for researchers who are trying to improve education. An ethical and legal conundrum stands in the way: how to responsibly share that data without opening students up to the possibility of having their personal information exposed to outside parties.

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Psychology OER PowerPoints

ShortCutsTV

As with their Sociology counterpart, Lumen Learning also supply a range of Psychology PowerPoint Presentations to support their (free) online Psychology course and complement the equally-free Openstax Introduction to Psychology Textbook. If you’re not familiar with this particualr text it’s an example of a growing field called OER (Open Educational Resources).

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College Uncovered, Season Two, Episode 6

The Hechinger Report

Student loans aren’t the only kind of university debt. Colleges and universities themselves have borrowed billions, mostly to keep building facilities they may or may not actually need as enrollment declines. Today, nearly 10 cents of every dollar in university budgets goes to pay the interest on institutional debt. Colleges and universities now collectively owe around a quarter of a trillion dollars, according to the Moody’s bond-rating agency.

K-12 70
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Accessibility Apologia

All Things Pedagogical

This week I received a few emails about attempts to make conferences accessible after the fact. Some of these emails asked for folk to approach these emails in good faith, that they understood that what they were proposing was far from what folk have been telling them for a long time, but at least it was something right? I am going to be honest (because I am never anything but this, if you know me and the work that I do, and what I advocate for) that emails like this really upset me more than gi

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‘College for What?' High School Students Want Answers Before Heading to Campus

ED Surge

ST. PAUL, Minn. — What do you want to be when you grow up? That’s a question long faced by high school students. But these days, students have access to far more information than in the past about what, specifically, they could do as a job after they graduate. And that is changing the way students are thinking about whether or not they want to go to college — or when they want to go.

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Early Humans as Endurance Runners

Anthropology.net

Scientists uncover compelling evidence suggesting that the hunting strategies of early humans involved long-distance running, challenging conventional beliefs about the physical demands and efficiency of such pursuits. Some hunts on foot covered 62 miles, the team say Credit: Alamy Challenging Assumptions Recent research published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour 1 challenges the prevailing notion that the endurance pursuit of prey, involving lengthy chases on foot, was an uncommon hunting

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Finding the Write Balance in the Ethics of AI

Heinemann Blog

Teachers' biggest concerns with AI are the ethics. Using ChatGPT as an ally alongside student writing encourages honest and productive use of the tool.

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Brown at 70: The Continued Pursuit Toward Equitable Education

Smithsonian Voices | Smithsonian Education

On the 70th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown v.

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RGS-IBG Discussion about support for teachers

Living Geography

As you may have read on this blog a few days ago, I am going to be working with the RGS as Vice President: Education from June. Prior to this announcement, the education team had organised a useful workshop which invites teachers (probably London based logistically speaking) to come along and discuss their needs. Details are here.

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Tackling Tech Pathway Challenges: AERA Debut Ignites Fresh Opportunities

Digital Promise

The post Tackling Tech Pathway Challenges: AERA Debut Ignites Fresh Opportunities appeared first on Digital Promise.

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A Closer Look at the Liujiang Specimen

Anthropology.net

The story of human evolution is etched in the ancient landscapes of China, where remarkable fossil finds offer tantalizing glimpses into our shared past. Among these treasures, the Liujiang human fossil have long captivated the imagination of researchers, offering valuable insights into the early occupation of Eastern Asia. Now, a groundbreaking study published in Nature Communications 1 has unveiled new age estimates and revised provenance information for these enigmatic remains, reshaping our