Sat.May 18, 2024 - Fri.May 24, 2024

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PROOF POINTS: AI essay grading is already as ‘good as an overburdened’ teacher, but researchers say it needs more work

The Hechinger Report

Grading papers is hard work. “I hate it,” a teacher friend confessed to me. And that’s a major reason why middle and high school teachers don’t assign more writing to their students. Even an efficient high school English teacher who can read and evaluate an essay in 20 minutes would spend 3,000 minutes, or 50 hours, grading if she’s teaching six classes of 25 students each.

Research 141
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2025 Bernice L. Fox Classics Writing Contest

Society for Classical Studies

2025 Bernice L. Fox Classics Writing Contest kskordal Thu, 05/23/2024 - 10:37 Image The Bernice L. Fox Classics Writing Contest Sponsored by the Department of Classics at Monmouth College Topic: One or More Figures from Classical History, Literature, or Mythology as the Next President of the United States, or Running for the Office Deadline: March 15, 2025, emailed to rsimmons@monmouthcollege.edu Contest Parameters and Judging: This contest is open to any student enrolled full-time in high schoo

History 124
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What Brain Science Says About How to Better Teach Teenagers

ED Surge

Ellen Galinsky has been on a seven-year quest to understand what brain science says about how to better teach and parent adolescent children. The past few years have seen advancements in our understanding of this time — where the brain is going through almost as much change as during the earliest years of a child’s life. In the past, Galinsky says, researchers and educators have focused too much on portraying the emotional turmoil and risky decision-making that is typical in adolescence as negat

Teaching 127
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Six Tips for Districts to Avoid the Next Funding Cliff

Digital Promise

Updated Technology Sustainability Toolkit helps districts plan their budgets with ending of COVID relief funds.

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Four cities of FAFSA chaos: Students tell how they grappled with the mess, stress

The Hechinger Report

By Liz Willen For many high school seniors and others hoping to attend college next year, the last few months have become a stress-filled struggle to complete the trouble-plagued, much-maligned FAFSA, or Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The rollout of this updated and supposedly simplified form was so delayed, error-ridden and confusing that it has derailed or severely complicated college decisions for millions of students throughout the U.S., especially those from low-income, first-gen

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A Remarkable Discovery of a 450,000-Year-Old Tooth in Iran

Anthropology.net

Introduction: A Landmark Discovery in Qaleh Kurd Cave In a momentous archaeological breakthrough, French and Iranian researchers have unearthed compelling evidence of early human habitation in Iran's Central Plateau, pushing back the known timeline of human settlement in the region by an astonishing 300,000 years. This discovery, centered at Qaleh Kurd Cave in Qazvin, not only redefines our understanding of ancient human migrations but also sheds light on the strategic importance of this region

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Professors Try ‘Restrained AI’ Approach to Help Teach Writing

ED Surge

When ChatGPT emerged a year and half ago, many professors immediately worried that their students would use it as a substitute for doing their own written assignments — that they’d click a button on a chatbot instead of doing the thinking involved in responding to an essay prompt themselves. But two English professors at Carnegie Mellon University had a different first reaction: They saw in this new technology a way to show students how to improve their writing skills.

Teaching 121

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Horticulture, horses and ‘Chill Rooms’: One district goes all-in on mental health support

The Hechinger Report

PITTSBURGH — Maria Hubal sent one student back to class just as another walked in. The sixth grader, slouched over with his hood pulled low, made a beeline to a hammock chair and curled up. Hubal, Bellevue Elementary’s behavioral health school educator, gently asked if everything was OK and what she could do to help. He said he was at a “red” — based on a color thermometer posted by the door that students can use to describe their stress level.

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Announcing the 2024 YouthMADE Festival Amplify Grant Recipients

Digital Promise

The post Announcing the 2024 YouthMADE Festival Amplify Grant Recipients appeared first on Digital Promise.

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Early Educators Deserve Better, Starting With Health Care and Retirement Benefits

ED Surge

About two years ago, I had a health crisis that not only jeopardized my well-being, but also threatened the continuity of care for the families I serve as the owner of a home-based child care program. One day when I was cleaning up at the end of a work day, I began experiencing heart palpitations and difficulty breathing. After a number of medical visits, I was hospitalized and eventually diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AFIB) — a condition which can lead to blood clots and a risk of stroke o

Education 119
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Announcing the 2024 Students of History Scholarship Winner

Students of History

We're excited to announce that Toyosi Dada, a graduating senior at Towson High School, has been awarded the 2024 Students of History Scholarship. This prestigious scholarship, which has been awarded each year since 2017, recognizes a college-bound senior who has excelled in history education. Toyosi will receive a $1,000 scholarship to support her studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where she plans to further her education.

History 98
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New data shows high totals of suspensions for missing class

The Hechinger Report

Many American students face a strange punishment for missing school: losing more class time. Educators nationwide regularly turn to suspension as a response to attendance problems, according to a Hechinger Report review of data from a dozen states that track this information. Between 2017-18 and 2021-22, school districts in those states cited attendance-related violations as a reason for student suspensions more than half a million times.

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Ancient Viruses in the Human Genome Linked to Mental Health Conditions

Anthropology.net

Ancient viruses that integrated into the human genome millions of years ago may influence the risk of mental health conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. These viruses, remnants of retroviruses known as human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), can exhibit abnormal activity levels in individuals genetically predisposed to these disorders, according to a recent study.

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Teachers Are Introducing Young Learners to Climate Consciousness. Hope Is Key, They Say.

ED Surge

Extreme weather events are on the rise around the globe, from historic floods to unseasonable heat waves and raging wildfires. One doesn’t have to reach far to find fuel for climate-related fear and anxiety. Heidi Rose, an elementary school teacher in Denver, Colorado, knows that all too well. She experienced years of what she describes as “pretty intense” climate anxiety, beginning around 2015, as she watched natural disasters unfold in the news and up close.

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Summer Sale for Teachers: Heinemann Audiobooks

Heinemann Blog

Celebrate summer with Heinemann Audiobooks! Audiobooks are discounted ONLY at Apple , Google Play , and Chirp from April 1 through July 31, 2024. Heinemann’s audiobooks provide you with the flexibility to listen and learn whenever and wherever you want.

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New superintendents need ‘a fighting chance for success’

The Hechinger Report

Since 2020, most of the nation’s 78 urban school districts have had a new superintendent take over. Just 11 have been in their jobs for four years or more. That statistic startled Michael Hinojosa, a former leader of the Dallas Independent School District who is now superintendent-in-residence at the Council for the Great City Schools, a coalition representing those 78 districts.

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Smithsonian Hosts an Education Conference Unlike Any Other This Summer

Smithsonian Voices | Smithsonian Education

The 4th annual National Education Summit is a one-of-a-kind, signature three-day program hosted by the Smithsonian, featuring inspiring keynotes, deep-dive sessions, hands-on workshops and an evening networking reception

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Why Healing Affinity Spaces Are Necessary for Black Women Educators

ED Surge

As Black womxn educators, we have a connection with education that is ancestral. Even before enslavement, teaching and learning existed in Africa. African communities built cities, states and kingdoms. Africans were skilled laborers, mathematicians and astronomers. Creativity, learning and innovation flourished in African communities, and that heritage lives in African descendants, especially apparent in the way we teach and radically care for our students.

Education 101
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The Week That Was In 505

Moler's Musing

Monday through Friday: Civil War Veteran EduProtocols Success Criteria This week, my students embarked on a fascinating research project to uncover the stories of Civil War veterans buried in Watkins Hill Cemetery, located right behind our school. By combining a series of EduProtocols, the students were able to organize their findings and piece together the contributions these brave soldiers made to the Union victory.

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OPINION: Students with disabilities should not lose their rights when they are placed in private settings by public school systems

The Hechinger Report

Picture a young girl named Emma, who finds herself transitioning from a public school to a private school due to her unique educational needs. The journey that Emma (a pseudonym) and other students like her embark upon will mean entering a world where protections they once relied on vanish. Every year, tens of thousands of U.S. students are placed in private schools at public expense to receive the Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) they are entitled to under the Individuals with Disabilit

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Read Aloud Podcast: Authentic Writing for Real Audiences

Heinemann Blog

In her book “Every Kid a Writer”, now available as an audiobook, Kelly Boswell reminds us that sometimes the hardest part about teaching writing is getting students to write at all.

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Assessment Culture: What It Is and Why It Matters

ED Surge

In the post-COVID pandemic educational setting, assessment offers ways to gain crucial insights into student thinking and learning and the areas requiring support for progress toward learning goals. While thoughtful assessment design and implementation are necessary for student success, building a strong assessment culture in schools is often overlooked but equally important.

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Why Teachers Stay: Building Inspiring, Responsive Leaders to Improve the Learning Experience for All

Education Elements

In one of our recent blogs , we noted that some teachers list “weak or uninspiring leadership” as a reason they are leaving their positions. Those who feel strongly that they are not supported by their school administration are at high risk of calling it quits. If we are relying on school leaders and building administrators to reverse this trend, we need to make sure we are equipping them with the skills they need to recognize, develop, motivate, and support teacher growth and development.

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More companies open on-site child care to help employees juggle parenting and jobs

The Hechinger Report

LAS VEGAS and RENO, Nev. — They exist in places like an airport, a resort, and a distribution center, tucked away from the public eye but close enough for easy access. They often emit laughter – and the sound of tumbling blocks, bouncing balls, and meandering tricycles. They’re child care centers based at workplaces. And in the increasingly fraught American child care landscape, they are popping up more frequently.

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Word Gardens: Engaging Students Outdoors

Heinemann Blog

As the weather warms up, get students engaged outdoors with word gardens. Valerie Bang-Jensen provides ideas and examples.

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Choosing Wisely: Lessons for Leaders in AI Integration

ED Surge

When it comes to AI in education, one edtech company stands out as a sage leader and trailblazing pioneer. Amid the chaotic deluge of new generative AI tools, claims and calamities inundating school leaders, Carnegie Learning has been all in on AI for nearly 25 years. After starting with MATHia , an adaptive AI tutor that personalizes instruction for middle and high school students, Carnegie Learning branched out last year into AI-based tools for literacy, languages, tutoring and even profession

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Ancient Chesapeake Site Challenges Timeline of Humans in the Americas

Anthropology.net

Unearthing History in the Chesapeake Bay With the Chesapeake Bay lapping at his knee-high boots, Darrin Lowery surveyed a 10-foot-tall bluff rising above a narrow strip of beach. To the untrained eye, this wall of sandy sediment is an unremarkable edge of a modest island southeast of the Bay Bridge. However, for Lowery, a coastal geologist, its crumbling layers place the island at the center of one of archaeology's most contentious battles: when and how humans first arrived in the Americas.

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70 years later, schools — and moms — are still fighting segregation

The Hechinger Report

This story was produced by The 19th and is reprinted with permission. PASADENA, Calif. — After starting elementary school in the late 1960s, Naomi Hirahara and three other girls formed a clique called the C.L.A.N., an acronym that represented each of the girl’s first initials. Hirahara said she and her friends didn’t consider the racial implications of their group’s name until one of their fathers objected: “The Klan is very bad!

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10 Principles of Artful Teaching

Heinemann Blog

The following is an adapted excerpt from Rebecca Bellingham’s The Artful Read-Aloud. Rebecca and Veronica Scott's new book, The Artful Approach to Exploring Identity and Fostering Belonging , releases in Fall 2024.

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PTI Primary Hub Meeting - 5th of June

Living Geography

One of my next events to speak at is this PTI Primary Hub meeting. The session is all about maps and mapping, and I will be doing a keynote and then assisting with a range of workshops. Booking still open I believe.

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Cultivating Modern Farms Using Ancient Lessons

Anthropology.net

Lessons from the Past: The Resilience of Ancient Agricultural Practices In numerous archaeological discoveries worldwide, evidence reveals how past civilizations coped with unforeseen climate changes and the sustainability challenges of their farming practices. These findings, ranging from the once-successful reservoirs and canals of Angkor Wat in Cambodia to the deserted Viking colonies of Greenland, highlight both failures and triumphs in ancient agricultural systems.

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‘Positive culture shock’ spells challenges and triumphs for Afghan teen students

The Hechinger Report

Attending school in America has been a “positive culture shock” to Marzia Mohammadi, a 17-year-old senior at Mt. Lebanon High School. This story was produced by Public Source and reprinted with permission. Mohammadi’s life changed overnight when she was forced to flee Afghanistan, her home country, following the Taliban’s ascension and the withdrawal of American troops from the region in August 2021.

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Dynamic Learning: Better Sleep – Better Grades

ShortCutsTV

Although there’s a long history of scientific research demonstrating the importance of sleep to memory, that’s not much comfort to students who find it difficult to get a good night’s sleep – particularly when faced with upcoming tests or exams.

History 52
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Revenge tourism

Living Geography

This has been a trend since the pandemic lockdowns which prevented people getting away. It is also called revenge travel. Revenge tourism is a phrase you may not have heard, but which I hadn't really considered before. It was clear that people would make up for 'lost time' and taking trips they might not otherwise have done. This is now becoming more widespread.

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Last Chance to Record Archaic Greek Language ‘Heading for Extinction’

Anthropology.net

The Romeyka language, an ancient Greek dialect on the verge of disappearing, is the focus of a new initiative led by Professor Ioanna Sitaridou of Queens' College and the Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages and Linguistics. This project aligns with the UN's International Decade of Indigenous Languages (2022-32), which seeks to bring attention to the plight of endangered languages and rally resources for their preservation and revitalization.

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Humans Who. Series Debut

Heinemann Blog

Shamari Reid kicks off the Humans Who… series with a live interview with NYT bestselling author Bettina L. Love! Tune into YouTube on May 30 at 7pm EST.

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Better Sleep: Better Grades

ShortCutsTV

Learn how to get a good night's sleep to improve your memory and grades.